published Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

Parkridge aims to reopen Cumberland Hall


by Emily Bregel

CHANGES REQUESTED

Parkridge Medical Center is requesting state approval to:

* Make permanent the temporary addition of 16 beds to Parkridge Valley Hospital

* Convert 25 geriatric psychiatric beds at Parkridge Medical Center to acute medical surgical beds

* Consolidate all adult and geriatric psychiatric care beds at the former Cumberland Hall site, to be named Parkridge Valley Adult Services

* Consolidate all child and adolescent psychiatric beds at Parkridge Valley Hospital

Source: Jerry Taylor, attorney with Farris Mathews Bobango

WHAT'S NEXT?

The Health Services and Development Agency is expected to hold a hearing on Parkridge Health System's certificate of need application on Sept. 26.

INPATIENT MENTAL HEALTH AND CRISIS SERVICES

* Parkridge Valley Hospital

* Moccasin Bend Mental Health Institute

* Erlanger North geriatric psychiatric program

* CADAS drug and alcohol treatment center

* Johnson Mental Health Center (residential services)

* Fortwood Center (adult residential services)

Parkridge Health System leaders are seeking state approval to offer adult and geriatric psychiatric care at the former Cumberland Hall mental health facility, which closed suddenly in January.

If the state approves, the new name of the facility on Standifer Gap Road would be "Parkridge Valley Adult Services."

Parkridge's existing psychiatric care satellite unit, Parkridge Valley, would shift its focus to children and adolescents.

When Cumberland Hall closed, 70 workers were laid off and 35 children were relocated.

Parkridge submitted its application for the certificate of need to the state Health Services and Development Agency on Tuesday. Parkridge President and CEO Darrell Moore was unavailable for comment Tuesday.

Parkridge, which is owned by HCA, is spending $5 million to buy and refurbish the Cumberland Hall building, attorney Jerry Taylor said.

The state will consider the certificate-of-need application in September, Mr. Taylor said.

At a cost of $1.7 million, 25 geriatric psychiatric beds now at Parkridge Medical Center would be changed to 25 acute medical surgical beds. The medical center on McCallie Avenue no longer would provide adult psychiatric services, according to a legal notice published in the Times Free Press.

After Cumberland Hall's closure in January, Parkridge requested emergency approval of 16 additional acute care beds to help displaced young patients. The hospital previously had 100 acute care and 24 residential beds.

Parkridge also is seeking approval for those emergency beds to become permanent additions to Parkridge Valley.

Continue reading by following this link to a related story:

Article: Closure of Cumberland Hall prompts new placements for kids

about Emily Bregel...

Health care reporter Emily Bregel has worked at the Chattanooga Times Free Press since July 2006. She previously covered banking and wrote for the Life section. Emily, a native of Baltimore, Md., earned a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from Columbia University. She received a first-place award for feature writing from the East Tennessee Society of Professional Journalists’ Golden Press Card Contest for a 2009 article about a boy with a congenital heart defect. She ...

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mybrwneyes78 said...

For the record - over 180 employees were left unemployed by the sudden closing of Cumberland Hall.

June 16, 2010 at 3:06 p.m.
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