published Friday, April 22nd, 2011

Tractor trailer wreck on I-75 now clear

Two lanes of traffic were closed off this morning on Interstate 75 northbound near the I-24 split because of a tractor trailer wreck that separated the trailer from its truck.  Cleanup from the accident has been completed and traffic is now running smoothly.

Contributed Photo by TDOT
Two lanes of traffic were closed off this morning on Interstate 75 northbound near the I-24 split because of a tractor trailer wreck that separated the trailer from its truck. Cleanup from the accident has been completed and traffic is now running smoothly. Contributed Photo by TDOT
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Rivieravol said...

Another day , another tractor trailer(s) blockage on the Interstates.

Anyone who drives I-75 between Knoxville and Atlanta or I-24 between Chattanooga and Nashville is literally playing Russian Roulette with their vehicle among the trucks.

They are either going 85 or 40, traveling in packs with no more than 30 feet between the trucks or going 40 MPH in the left lane going up Monteagle or the Ridge Cut.

Since they are all in constant communication we need the THP to invest more in unmarked cars to enforce the laws. And we also need more laws:

  1. $1000 a mile for every speeding violation over 75MPH.

  2. $1000 for any truck going less than the Minimum posted speed limit outside of the very right lane. How many times have you been behind a truck in the left lane going 40MPH passing another truck going 39?

  3. $1000 for violation of the 150 foot limit between trucks on the interstate.

  4. $10,000 for any truck in the left lane where there are 3 lanes(Monteagle and the Ridge Cut.

April 22, 2011 at 10:24 a.m.
kariann01 said...

I can understand the frustration of Rivieravol, but the problem is not always the truck drivers. I have myself have driven quite frequently the ridge cut and there are more cars in violation than trucks. For the most part I have seen the trucks maintain the outermost right lane, yes there are a few that do go around making it difficult to navigate. I have also seen cars cut off the trucks making it very difficult for them to keep a safe distance between. The fines that you so freely want handed out should apply to four wheelers also. Most drivers today do not have any respect for the other drivers PERIOD. All you need to do is actually ride with a truck driver to see what they have to put up with also. Yes there are bad apples that make all look bad, but for the most part they are all just out there to do a job. It is not an easy one and is really stressful. I would just challenge everyone to just be a little more cautious and realize that we all have to share the roads

April 22, 2011 at 7:10 p.m.
ccgibby01 said...

Both of you make valid points. Please don't forget that 98% of the time when crashes involving tractor trailers occur, they go uninjured. The other vehicle/car are injured, disabled, or killed. You CAN'T win with a truck, PERIOD. Not to mention they do not have under-ride guards to prevent vehicles from going under them. Lastly, 4,000 people are killed every year in truck related crashes with many, many, many, more injured or disabled. We have to share the roadway but they definitely have the advantage.

June 12, 2011 at 9:20 p.m.
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