published Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

Hamilton County public schools lag for minority students

Superintendent of Hamilton County Schools Rick Smith listens during a talk with editors of Chattanooga Times Free Press recently.
Superintendent of Hamilton County Schools Rick Smith listens during a talk with editors of Chattanooga Times Free Press recently.
Photo by Alex Washburn.
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  • Rick Smith editorial board
    Hamilton County Schools superintendent Rick Smith talks about local school's Adequate Year Progress (AYP) scores during a recent Times Free Press editorial board meeting.

Of the 37 Hamilton County public schools that failed to achieve federal standards this year, 29 fell short because they struggled to educate poor black students, an analysis of test results shows.

Superintendent Rick Smith said it was those students’ test scores that forced the district into a high-priority category, at risk of state takeover if scores don’t improve.

Lagging achievement among low-income, minority students is a persistent problem here and elsewhere, one that the federal No Child Left Behind law was intended to address.

Yet despite recent test gains among low-income black students — in preliminary data from the most recent test results, some elementary schools had a 20 percent increase in the number of proficient and advanced students — the county schools still have a long way to go.

“It’s clear the schools have made progress, but the gap is there and we have to address it,” said Dan Challener, president of the Public Education Foundation, a nonprofit that supports local schools. “A lot of work has to be done.”

A Chattanooga Times Free Press analysis of the latest results from standardized tests in Hamilton County Schools also showed:

• Elementary school students outperformed those in middle school, achieving higher proficiency marks in reading and math across the board and having far fewer students below grade level. Only 10.5 percent of third-graders are considered below grade level in math, but by eighth grade that number jumps to 33.9 percent.

• The biggest improvements occurred at the middle school level. The number of students considered proficient or advanced increased 10.4 percentage points among sixth-graders, 9.5 points among seventh-graders and 7.5 points among eighth-graders.

• Although the system made gains in all subject areas, less than half — 44 percent — of public school students are proficient in math. In reading, 45.6 are proficient.

And 20.8 percent of students are below grade level in math, and 14.7 percent are below grade level in reading.

The numbers don’t surprise Smith. He didn’t expect schools to each produce the required 40 percent of proficient and advanced students in math or the 49 percent of proficient and advanced students in reading. He certainly doesn’t expect them to have all children proficient by 2014, as No Child Left Behind mandates.

State officials also call the goals unrealistic. Last week, Gov. Bill Haslam made Tennessee the first state to ask for a four-year exemption until problems with the law are worked out.

BY THE NUMBERS
  • 71: Public schools in Hamilton County
  • 37: Number that failed to achieve federal standards
  • 19: Number of schools on the No Child Left Behind high-priority list
  • 44: Percentage of Hamilton County public school students proficient in math
  • 45.6: Percentage of county students proficient in reading

Source: Hamilton County Board of Education

“It’s getting close to impossible” to meet the federal requirements, said Smith. “It is a tremendous expectation.”

Under No Child Left Behind, schools are required to achieve overall goals in the subjects tested. But they also are required to meet them in 18 subgroups.

Being on or off the list of struggling schools can come down to one or two students in a specific subgroup, Smith said.

No Child Left Behind results can amount to a public relations nightmare for schools because it effectively labels schools as good or bad, but Smith said there is an important lesson from the numbers.

Hamilton County school leaders must make literacy, math and leadership improvements a priority if they want to increase the performance of low-income, minority students and make gains overall as a system, he said.

school numbers

Of 39 elementary schools, 16 failed to meet AYP standards. Data from the report show that 14 of those 16 elementary schools failed, in part, because of poor scores in reading or math among economically disadvantaged black students.

Two schools, Bess T. Shephard Elementary and Clifton Hills Elementary, also were flagged for low scores among Hispanic students.

At the middle-school level, Brown Middle, a Title 1 school with a majority of black students, made adequate yearly progress along with Loftis and Soddy-Daisy middle schools. The other eight middle schools did not make AYP because of reading or math scores among black and economically disadvantaged students.

Four of the five high schools that fell short of federal benchmarks were cited for poor scores among black and economically disadvantaged students.

But some are finding ways to reach these subgroups of students.

  • photo
    Dan Challener, president of the Public Education Foundation, a nonprofit that supports local schools.

The key is retaining good teachers, said Challener, whose foundation oversees the Benwood Initiative, a nonprofit that funnels extra money to schools. It trains principals and teachers and works to improve education in 16 inner-city public schools.

Strong principals, professional development, coaching and smaller class sizes have helped Benwood schools retain some successful teachers, even when the pay hasn’t been significantly different.

“Teachers are the critical element to student achievement, and we as a community have to attract, retain and train outstanding teachers. The standards have been raised ... the urgency is really clear,” Challener said.

Brown Middle School is one place where inroads are being made.

Last year, only 15 percent of Brown Middle’s students were considered proficient in math but this year that increased to 35 percent, said Principal Justin Robertson.

Sixty-four percent of Brown’s students are on free or reduced-price lunch — a common measure of poverty — and nearly 70 percent are minority.

Robertson said the school has been concentrating on raising test scores.

One of the big changes, he said, was that math teachers started working together more closely.

They met daily to talk about what students were and weren’t doing well, and the effort showed that students who traditionally struggle can be reached, he said.

“Too many times teachers go in the room and work by themselves, and we try hard not to do that,” he said. “It made a huge difference.”

Contact Joan Garrett at jgarrett@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6601.

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about Joan Garrett McClane...

Joan Garrett McClane has been a staff writer for the Times Free Press since August 2007. Before becoming a general assignment writer for the paper, she wrote about business, higher education and the court systems. She grew up the oldest of five sisters near Birmingham, Ala., and graduated with a master's and bachelor's degrees in journalism from the University of Alabama. Before landing her first full-time job as a reporter at the Times Free Press, ...

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maddawg said...

Is anyone really surprised? It does not matter how good your teacher or principal is. What matters is having children who are prepared to learn when they get to school. Many of the black children do not value an education because their parents and grandparents do not. Listen closely to a group of black kids talking. You cannot even understand what they are saying. This is learned behavior from their parents and grandparents. Their only interest is long nails, hair weaves, dreadlocks, new clothes, cell phones, rap music and violence. Until this cycle is broken many black children will always be on a downward spiral as soon as they are born.

August 9, 2011 at 6:46 a.m.
dao1980 said...

What about Indian, Korean, Japanese, or Chinese children?

They are also minorities, aren't they?

How are they doing in school these days?

August 9, 2011 at 7:31 a.m.
Oz said...

“Teachers are the critical element to student achievement, and we as a community have to attract, retain and train outstanding teachers. The standards have been raised ... the urgency is really clear,” Challener said.

WRONG...Teachers are a major componet but parents are the critical element in student achievement. Without parental support and involvement in the education process, children will not succeed. No amount of money spent in the classroom will replace the encouragement and support of a parent.

August 9, 2011 at 7:38 a.m.
bandmom said...

The Hamilton County Dept. of Education does not appear to be interested in hiring more quality, experienced teachers. I know someone who moved here from another state with 30 years experience and a master's degree and could not even get past the rude people at the central office to get her application released to principals for any of the available jobs. HCDE staff were so unprofessional that this person ultimately wanted no part of HCDE and decided to take less money for a private school or something in a different field.

August 9, 2011 at 7:47 a.m.
twharr said...

@ maddawg, what about the dip spitting, mountain dew drinking, meth heads that are in the suburban schools? The problem is not racial; its intelligence versus ignorance. Your ignorant ass probably works at an instant oil change or used tire place. Oops...I didn't mean to sound like you. Do me a favor, don't watch college or pro sports anymore, because the same people you criticize entertain you on Saturdays and Sundays come this fall. Do me one more favor, copy your comment on a huge poster board and take it to a stadium or to the hood. Let's see how much support you get. Do what you do best, flip a burger, change my oil and make sure my tires are inflated to the proper level.

August 9, 2011 at 8:37 a.m.
inquiringmind said...

Maddawg, your comment borders close to, if not into racism. In the 1950's-1970's we had an obvious racial problem, segregated schools and neigborhoods that led to econonic segregation.

That racial segregation has turned into an economic segregation is fairly obvious. We can point to a lot of reasons, for example, African-American men are more likely to be arrested and put into jail, are more likely to be targeted by police regardless of whether they have done anythng wrong (because they are black and live in a seregated neighborhood), and ask anyone, except a rich convicted congressman or sheriff whose been in jail about how hard it is to get a job after spending a little time in jail. You can talk to most educated African-American men and get a good idea of the inherent prejudie still lurking in white society in this town.

Oz to blame it on the parents ignores the foundation of the problem. It is what T.S. Eliot called a facile answer to a difficult problem.

Dao we don't (as a rule) treat Indian, Korean, Japanese, or Chinese children and families the way we have historically treated African-Americans. We did lock up illegally all the Japanese American citizens in WWII though.

Until folks start going into these urban neighborhoods and working selflessly with programs that focus on youth (note the problem begins in the transition to middle school), that is until you all start acting on the compassion (and risk) a Christian is supposed to show, you should not expect to inherit anything but the consequences of what you sow, the social trainwreck we have.

Not even good teachers can help, given the situation, and for teacher representatives to suggest so is self-serving. To blame parents or grandparents or squawk about how hard it is to understand the talk also is self-serving. Do you complain about our good German friends at VW? Or Henry Kissinger? Or a rural farm boy?

No one in Chattanooga wants to admit the fact that we created this mess over decades if not a century, and only we can fix it and I doubt in any faster time than it took to create it.

Bandmom, I know a highly educated person who had the same experience. Many in the main office and classroom are afraid of higly qualified people that did not come out of the diploma mills of colleges teaching secondary education. Most of them who went back to get the degree to get into teraching laugh about the curiculum. The problem is not local to Chattanoga. I had the experience in Atlanta, the principal at a prominient Alnata school wanted to hire me but said it was too hard a job to get the approval past the main office.

August 9, 2011 at 8:39 a.m.
CBIKAS said...

If you take some time to look at how resources are allocated by the HCDE you will see why so many minorty low-income students underachieve. The implicit message is that they are inherently inferior. Therefore the school system is not at fault for these terrible results. It's a polite form of racism. But if Chattanooga is going to grow into a world-class international city we have to move past this mentality.

August 9, 2011 at 9:25 a.m.
maddawg said...

twharr.....what about the dip spitting, mountain dew drinking meth heads in suburban schools?? The article I was commenting on is about black youths in Chattanooga schools failing. You are right about one thing, "the problem is not racial its intelligence versus ignorance". Intelligent parents prepare their children for school and teach their children the value of an education. Ignorant parents do not. That goes for parents of all races.
By the way, I have lost my interest in football due to the thug nature of the players over the last couple decades.

August 9, 2011 at 9:47 a.m.
maddawg said...

inquiringmind......So, pointing out the facts is racism?? Doesn't bother me a bit, that word is tossed around so often it has no impact anymore. Are any of my comments false?? You made the following comment: "Until folks start going into these urban neighborhoods and working selflessly with programs that focus on youth (note the problem begins in the transition to middle school), that is until you all start acting on the compassion (and risk) a Christian is supposed to show, you should not expect to inherit anything but the consequences of what you sow, the social trainwreck we have.

Why should anyone have to go into these urban neighborhoods to work selflessly doing what the parents should be doing??? These kids can learn just like kids of other races. Why don't they???? That is the problem people like you need to address. Lord knows enough money has been thrown away trying to fix those schools to no avail. The problem is the parents and the culture.

August 9, 2011 at 10:05 a.m.
crow1033 said...

"One of the big changes, he said, was that math teachers started working together more closely."

It has only been a recent measure and sparsely used in Hamilton County schools to have lateral and vertical planning. Meaning, that a teacher collaborates with the other grade level teachers and upper and lower subject teachers. If the elementary school teachers don't know what is expected of students in middle school, how can they appropriately prepare them? Also, each teacher may teach their 'own' curriculum in a class room so that students coming from one teacher may be more/less prepared than from another teacher. This seems like a really simple measure to put in place that HCDE has failed at accomplishing. Also, if a student lags behind, there are NO mechanisms in place to provide added support before he/she gets too far behind unless a willing teacher feels compelled to do so. It is not rocket science. HCDE is just caught up in the doing what they have always done. Incentive pay, support staff and tutoring programs would be felt instantaneously. Instead money gets spent on the cogs of the machine. Lowering standards and expectations may make your "high priority" schools score better, but you are not doing your students any favors. What happens when 40% of students who can't read or add enter the workforce? And we wonder why our economy is in shambles!

August 9, 2011 at 10:31 a.m.
chad77 said...

Black people in Europe don't act or behave like black people in the USA. So clearly it is a cultural and lack of education problem. Get the chip off your shoulder, start caring about your community/family and help yourselves to an education. The inner city schools have more tax money per student and resources thrown at them then the suburban schools. Suburban schools have a lot due to their community providing for them. Stop blaming teachers for your failed society! I am sure some will say this is racist and it is not. I am just sick of the poor, poor me and it is everybody else fault attitude.

August 9, 2011 at 10:38 a.m.
01centare said...

Many of the black children do not value an education because their parents and grandparents do not

If the above were true, the problem could be solved immediately by assuring determined and qualified teachers regardless. There's more that has gone on than disinteresed parents and grandparents. Particuarly for Black students, their learning process has been systematically sabotaged for decades. Has racism played a role? For sure!! Has unqualified teachers, black and white, played a role? Most certainly!! Over the years black parents were forced from being active in their children's learning process, because 1. they actually turned out to do a better job than some teachers. 2. They witnessed and began to report things the system wish to remain hidden.

August 9, 2011 at 11:52 a.m.
fedup350 said...

maddawg is exactly right, it is a culteral problem. They black teens of today ridicule other black teens who do well in school. The problem? No parental control.

twharr from your post I can see clearly that you are the rascist, not maddog. Did you even read the article? It was about BLACK youth failing not white youth. Quit making excuses for them. They dont learn because they dont want to learn and there is no one around them, mothers or fathers (especially fathers) that discipline them enough to make them learn. Your mind set is the problem, blame it on someone else, it is not our fault, we are black, it is the white mans fault. Wake up! It is not the teachers fault. It is the lack of parental guidance and the black culture. What do you expect of young people whose heros are rap artists? They degrade women and promote money and violence over hard work and self respect. Just so you know..I dont watch pro sports. It is amazing to me that one pro sports player can make more money in one year than every Hamilton County School teacher combined. That is also part of the problem.

01centare you are another excuse maker. What in the world are you talking about? You are another of the 'perpetual victims". You blame everything on race. How can an Asian or East Indian come to this country and not even speak English but within a short time own their own business and prosper? I will tell you why. It is their culture to work for what you have not subsist on a government check and then complain that they have no opportunity. With affirmative action blacks have more opportunity than white people do but they continue to fail and do what? Blame other people and the fact that they are black for thier failures. It is the mind set of you 01centare and you twharr that is the problem.

August 9, 2011 at 2 p.m.
dregstudios said...

Bill IS on a roll between taking the word “gay” out of school, making it illegal to send an offensive email, making it illegal to post offensive images to the internet, and NOW leaving the government program put in place to raise our expectations of schools. I was compelled to create a visual commentary in response Governor Haslam’s blatant smothering of Civil Rights in our state on my blog at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/07/potentially-offensive-portrait-governor.html where you can see my new portrait of the Governor and First Lady of TN to defend Freedom of Speech.

August 9, 2011 at 3:27 p.m.
twharr said...

@ fedup350, I was ridiculing Maddawgs clandestinely racist remark twit. Allow me to dumb it down for you. Most African Americans actually have college degrees and do prosper. The media consistently exploits the negative and not the positive of African Americans. All you see in the media is a black did this and a black did that. You rarely see violent white crimes, yet when I look at the "Right to Know" link on this website I see TONS of white people busted for drugs, rape, prostitution, robbery, burglary, DUIs, etc... As I posted above it's not about black or white its ignorance and intelligence. Stop letting the media spoon feed you and formulate your own opinion based on facts. Oh and by the way, not all black youth have rappers as their role models and the many that I know have fathers at home.

August 9, 2011 at 3:36 p.m.
fedup350 said...

twharr let me say this as plain as I can for you since you are missing the point. The article was about black youth failing and you are not even clandestinely rasict you were blatantly rasict in your post about white youth. Did you think you were being funny? Arrogant and blatantly rascist is what I see. You didnt even begin to comment on the article just rascist remarks about kids that the story wasnt even about. Then you get on here and pretend that you meant something else. No need to "dumb it down". You were very clear in your post and everyone can see right through you. Let me "dumb it down" for you..I am ridiculing your post and your rebuttal. You had nothing to say upon the subject except to riducle another race. What about the 29 inner city schools that cant measure up. I can make up my own mind from what I see everyday, certainly not what the media tells me and certainly not the lie that liberals live and the plain fact is that most black kids are in a one parent (mother or grandmother) home. It is a FACT and no amount of you riduiculing another race will change that. Is that dumed down enough for you?

August 9, 2011 at 5:06 p.m.
sangaree said...

quote: "maddawg is exactly right, it is a culteral problem. They black teens of today ridicule other black teens who do well in school"

Sorry, but that myth was debunked over a decade ago. It's like those spam emails that circulates on the web for years and years although they've been proven over and over again to be a lie.

If teachers in the past, with far less of an education than the ones have today, were able to produce scientist, mathematicians, biologists, researchers and some of the greatest minds the world came to know, even as their parents were illiterate. Parents who could neither read, write and figure, let alone help or prepare their children at home for school, then there's much more going on today than disinterested parents and grandparents.

There still remains class and even racial bigotry in today's teaching that far too often cripples the learning exerpience for poor black and brown children. When black parents complained, they were ostracized and no longer welcome in the schools. Edcuators, even some principals, took it out on the student. Either by harrasing the student and making false allegations of descipline problems or grading down their work. It's true the power of tne pen in the wrong hands can do as much and more damage as the rogue authority figure who holds a weapon.

While one has the power to physically harm and kill, the other holds the power to spiritually, emotionally and psychologically harm and kill.

August 9, 2011 at 5:21 p.m.
sangaree said...

twharr, you're post is very much appreciated and so true. Thank you.

August 9, 2011 at 5:26 p.m.
fedup350 said...

It is not a myth, it the truth, what planet do you live on sangaree or what dream world? Get you head out of the sand and quit blaming the failures on everyone but the ones who are doing the failing. I still say it is the black culture of today and your "its not their fault" attitue doesnt help. So now you are blaming the teachers? Or the white people are rascist? Excuses, excuses, excuses are all that you have.

August 9, 2011 at 5:31 p.m.
sangaree said...

fedup350 said: "It is not a myth, it the truth, what planet do you live on sangaree or what dream world?"

sorry, fedup350, it was proven a myth a long time ago. I'm still living on planet earth, while you're obviously squirming in some eternal inferno of your own making. You are obviously the most bitter and hate filled person anyone has ever come across.

August 9, 2011 at 5:37 p.m.
fedup350 said...

sangaree, does it help you in some way to make the words so big? So you resort to name calling. Typical when you cant defend your point. Just because you in your great wisdom say it is a myth doesnt make it a myth, it only makes you wrong. Bitter? Not at all. Tired of peoiple like you making excuses? Absolutely! Oh should I have made that into big letters for you??

August 9, 2011 at 5:45 p.m.
Veritas said...

The schools are not at fault, the "poor black students" don't want to be educated. They, like their parents, flaunt their ignorance. It's far easier to rely on the "gubment check" than to provide for themselves.

August 9, 2011 at 5:45 p.m.
sangaree said...

fedup350 said...

sangaree, does it help you in some way to make the words so big? So you resort to name calling. Typical when you cant defend your point. Just because you in your great wisdom say it is a myth doesnt make it a myth, it only makes you wrong. Bitter? Not at all. Tired of peoiple like you making excuses? Absolutely! Oh should I have made that into big letters for you??

Are you jealous that I know how to make BIG words and you don't?

Paraphrasing here: And just because you can't defend your point doesn't mean you have to always be on the attack of black people everytime there's a negative article in the papers about them.

Parapharsing you AGAIN: And just because in your own GREAT WISDOM you say it doesn't make it true either.

Should YOU make that into big letters?

It's a free country do whatever your darken heart inspires you to do. Which so far is bitter and hate filled.

Darling, you are the princess of negative name calling.

August 9, 2011 at 6:17 p.m.
sangaree said...

Veritas said... The schools are not at fault, the "poor black students" don't want to be educated. They, like their parents, flaunt their ignorance. It's far easier to rely on the "gubment check" than to provide for themselves.


Sorry veritas, but I've personnally known teachers, and even principals, who have retaliated against the student whose parents had the audacity to complain about incompetent and abusive teachers. Especially so those parents with children in predominantely inner-city schools. Their much easier targets and far less believable when attempting to expose abuses and incompetence.

August 9, 2011 at 6:22 p.m.
fedup350 said...

Hey sangaree I think you are discriminating against me..you didnt make Veritas words bigger. Whats up with that? You must like me..you called me darling...but flattery will get you no where. You are still wrong. make that bigger...princess

August 9, 2011 at 6:27 p.m.
fedup350 said...

So Sangaree..YOU have personally known teachers? I guess that makes you an expert on the subject. What about the 23 Howard students who were arrested during the first two weeks of school last year for fighting. Was that the teachers fault? Was that Rhonda "the boogey woman" fault? Just who sangaree, in your infinate knowledge of the world from your key board, whose fault would you say that was? Certainly not the students who were fighting each other, oh no not thier fault, there has to be someone else we can blame for that too....princess of the key board...

August 9, 2011 at 6:34 p.m.
fedup350 said...

and furthermore sangaree I am only on the attack when people like you make excuses. People are responsible for their actions no matter what their race. According to you no matter what happens it it always someon elses fault when it comes to a black person, They are as accountable as anyone else. Quiting blaming everyone else for your shortcomings and failures, no bitterness at all no matter how many times you say it. It is frustration with irresponsible people always blaming someone else..princess. Oh and How DO you make those big letters???? Signed, your darling fedup350

August 9, 2011 at 6:43 p.m.
328Kwebsite said...

Another great article by Joan Garrett.

How many students are we holding back each year because they are not meeting the requirements for their grade level?

After years in the military, and quite a bit of personal failure myself, I cannot understand how it is we would expect to pass any student who does not meet the standard of what's expected of him.

Why is it unrealistic to suppose that we drop the ratio of students who are not meeting their grade level of academic performance? It would seem to me that immediately halting their advancement and requiring re-training on the topic would be a key part of ensuring satisfactory progress.

That's what the military does. Recycle and retrain failures until the standard can be achieved. It's either GO or NO-GO, and there's no passing besides getting it done.

Ask any veteran. Sooner or later, you're going to get the test you don't pass the first time. Then, it's retrain and re-test until it's done. I know I've trained some Soldiers who took weeks to pass tests that others aced on the first try. That's just life. Normal people have limits on their abilities. They require practice to get it right. In this case, that practice is called Schoolwork.

It won't be a money saving measure, either.

In common commerce, like The Trades, an inability to perform to standard the first time often leads to immediate and unexplained and unsupported job termination. At least with school, we can recycle those students.

Why are we not doing this? Why are we passing students when it's obvious they are failing? All we are doing with that is making it that much harder for them to succeed at the next stage of annual education.

If it takes a few years of holding back 40% of our students, that's exactly what I'd expect we do. If the situation involves such a large segment of our population, then we may very well need to create special hold-back schools to prepare the students for re-qualification exams. Year-round schooling may be an option for those who are failing on the 180 days a year of secondary school. As it is, we really need to get the school year for average students up to near 270 days a year; or, implement something that is at least competitive with 220+ day school years in other countries.

I know the article mainly discussed minorities who are doing poorly in school. We're aware that ethnicity has little bearing on objective, demonstrable performance. There's no skin color exam. We're confident there are plenty of failures getting passed on to the next grade in predominantly white areas, private schools and any other place that seems to be a haven for favor.

Failure is an equal opportunity employer. It's also an opportunist.

Stop passing kids who are failing. If we need to school them all year, then that's better than passing a failure on to a more difficult level of testing and failure.

August 9, 2011 at 7:30 p.m.
SavartiTN said...

Sangaree said LARGELY...

"quote: "maddawg is exactly right, it is a culteral problem. They black teens of today ridicule other black teens who do well in school"

Sorry, but that myth was debunked over a decade ago. It's like those spam emails that circulates on the web for years and years although they've been proven over and over again to be a lie."

Interesting LIE of your own there. Over the years I have had numerous discussions with straight A black students who were teased and tormented by their own race for trying to be like "whitey." I was first told this back in 1986. I was last told this last year.

You are perpetuating a myth of you own.

August 9, 2011 at 8:07 p.m.
ceeweed said...

Education starts at birth. Children come into this world with a brain hungry for knowledge... In order for a child to learn, there has to be shelter, structure, security, sustenance, discipline, and love. Parents who make sacrifices to provide these elements for their children will reap the benefits. They will see the pay off everyday. Children born into chaos and uncertainty will struggle. It is not about race!

August 9, 2011 at 10:17 p.m.
amnestiUSAF84 said...

328Kwebsite said: Ask any veteran. Sooner or later, you're going to get the test you don't pass the first time.

That works for the military, because the military is determined to inspire its personnel to succeed. That failure is not an option. Succeeding determines if an instructor or I.T. will get promoted, retain his or her position or not. Unfortunately, until recent times, no such expectations have been considered on teachers performance. In fact, until recent times, the more failing students the more federal funds were sent down to the school system. Which allowed for already slacking teachers to slack even more or to not teach at all.

Also, in military standards, if even one individual in a unit is failing the entire unit is encouraged to get behind him or her in support. Otherwise, the entire unit is made to suffer consequences. That doesn't happen in the school environment.

August 9, 2011 at 10:46 p.m.
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