published Sunday, December 4th, 2011

Convicted killer goes to law school

About 19 years ago, a 20-year-old Rhode Island man by the name of Bruce Reilly stabbed and beat to death a 58-year-old English professor.

He was convicted of second-degree murder and robbery, and he served only 12 years in prison.

But despite knowing Reilly's criminal record, the law school at Tulane University has admitted him as a student -- even though his record may preclude Reilly from practicing law!

Incredibly, he is getting student loans and scholarships to attend Tulane. Even more incredibly, the dean of the law school suggested that convicted killer Reilly was admitted because he would "contribute to his and his peers' study and appreciation of various aspects of the law."

Reilly says people should take into account his work since prison as a liberal community activist.

We are glad if he is trying to reform, but it's shockingly unjust to give one of the limited spots available in law school to a convicted killer, rather than to a law-abiding student.

We live in interesting times -- and that's not always a good thing.

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John_Proctor said...

The only difference between this guy and other lawyers is that he committed his felonies BEFORE going to law school. The others wait until they get a law license and a briefcase before committing crimes.

December 4, 2011 at 12:32 p.m.
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