published Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

Braly: Mustard sauce enhances pork loin

I've always heard that eating pork on New Year's Day will bring money and happiness. I'm not going to deny superstition. Even if I don't wake up to be a millionaire some morning in 2012, I still would have had an excellent meal to ring in the new year.

I always try to grill pork loin sometime on Dec. 31, so I'm hoping for good weather. It makes grilling so much more pleasant.

If you don't have your own recipe for grilled pork loin, it's simple. Just season the loins with salt and pepper or other favorite seasonings and grill them over hickory coals till a meat thermometer registers 160 F. Remove from the grill, and let them come to room temperature. Because I grill a day ahead, I wrap them in foil at this point and refrigerate them till I'm ready to serve.

The other recipe I want to include is for mustard sauce. I like to serve it with the pork, and it always draws raves. It's best made a day or two ahead, and it lasts several weeks in the refrigerator.

To serve, I slice the pork into thin slices, then let people spread the mustard sauce on. You can add party bread to make into sandwiches, or just go solo by spreading a little mustard on a slice and eating it without bread, almost like chips and dip. Watch your amounts, though. It's rather hot.

I got this recipe from a friend about 30 years ago. She used to make it and give it to friends during the holidays, which was always something I looked forward to, and now I'm happy to pass it on. Hope you enjoy!

Hot Mustard

1 cup white vinegar

1 large (4-ounce) can dry mustard

3/4 cup sugar

2 eggs, beaten

Mix vinegar and dry mustard together, and refrigerate overnight. In a double boiler over simmering water, add mustard mixture, sugar and beaten eggs. Cook about 5 minutes or until mixture begins to coat back of spoon. Pour into jars, bring to room temperature and refrigerate. It will thicken as it chills.

While many restaurants will take New Year's Day off after staying busy on New Year's Eve, Easy Bistro will be open and serving a Resolution Brunch from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be a number of special items, many of which will include the lucky foods associated with New Year's celebrations, such as black-eyed peas and locally grown greens. To toast the new year, chef Erik Neil and crew will serve freshly squeezed blood orange mimosas. Easy Bistro is at 203 Broad St. For reservations, call 266-1121.

In the new year, which is just days away, I'll do my best to keep my weight under control, but golly it's hard. You see, I'm a lover of peanut butter. Last week's Side Orders column had one of the best -- if not the best -- peanut butter pie recipes I've ever had. And now one of the world's favorite brands of peanut butter has announced its Jif New Classics recipe contest. Those submitting their favorite peanut butter recipe have a chance to win one of two $10,000 prizes. Now wouldn't that help pay off some of your Christmas debt?

But you must enter quickly. The deadline is Jan. 16. Enter your favorite recipe in one of two categories: Sweet or savory. Recipes must include at least two tablespoons of any variety of Jif and must yield at least six servings. To enter, log onto jif.com.


Happy new year to you all. I look forward to sharing more food news with you in 2012 and hope you'll share your culinary ideas and suggestions with me.

Email Anne Braly at abraly@timesfreepress.com.

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