published Thursday, February 10th, 2011

Egypt's Mubarak transfers power to vice president, refuses to step down

CAIRO — Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced he is handing his powers over to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, and ordered constitutional amendments Thursday. But the move means he retains his title of president and ensures regime control over the reform process, falling short of protester demands.

Protesters in Cairo's central Tahrir Square, hoping he would announce his resignation outright, reacted in fury and disbelief.

Many watched in stunned silence to his speech, slapping their hands to their foreheads in anger and shock, some crying or waving their shoes in the air in a sign of contempt. After he finished, they resumed their chants of "Leave! Leave! Leave!" The crowd in the square had swelled to severals hundred thousand in anticipation of the nighttime address.

"I have seen that it is required to delegate the powers and authorities of the president to the vice president, as dictated in the constitution," Mubarak said near the end of a 15-minute address on state TV. The article is used to transfer powers if the president is unable to carry out his duties "due to any temporary obstacle" and does not mean his resignation.

He said he would stay in the country and that he is "adamant to continue to shoulder my responsibility to protect the constituion and safegaurd the interests of the people ... until power is handed over to those elected in September by the people in free and fair elections in which all the guarantees of transparencies will be secured."

Mubarak said that the demands of protesters for democracy are just and legitimate, but he adhered tightly to a framework for reform that Suleiman drew up and that protesters have roundly rejected, fearing it will mean only cosmetic change.

He said he had requested the amendment of five articles of the constitution to loosen the now restrictive conditions on who can run for president, to restore judicial supervision of elections, and to impose term limits on the presidency.

He also annulled a constitutional article that gives the president the right to order a military trial for civilians accused of terrorism. He said that step would "clear the way" for eventually scrapping a hated emergency law that gives police virtually unlimited powers of arrest, but with a major caveat — "once security and stability are restored."

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nucanuck said...

wildman yawn's as 80 million Egyptians struggle for freedom and basic human rights without a jackboot on ther necks.

How can we not care deeply for the human struggle of others?

February 10, 2011 at 7:47 p.m.
rick1 said...

Those 80 million Egyptians will not have freedom or human rights if the Muslim Brotherhood(MB)becomes involved in the government. Lets look at the Muslim Brotherhood.

Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood Presses Government for Nuclear Weapons. In the summer of 2006...the Muslim Brotherhood...escalated its nuclear goals and openly called for Egypt to develop nuclear weapons as a counter to Israel's nuclear capabilities...Dr. Hamdi Hassan, spokesperson of the Muslim Brotherhood parliamentary caucus, made clear that his organization was interested...in creating an Egyptian nuclear deterrent: "We [Egyptians] are ready to starve in order to own a nuclear weapon that will represent a real deterrent and will be decisive in the Arab-Israeli conflict." http://www.wmdinsights.com/I10/I10_ME3_EgyptianMuslim.htm

Now lets look how the Obama Adminstration looks at the MB.

Josh Gerstein of Politico reports our Director of National Intellegence James Clapper said the following about the Brotherhood: Clapper called Egypt's branch of the Muslim Brotherhood movement "largely secular."

In response to questioning from Rep. Sue Myrick (R-N.C.) about the threat posed by the group, Clapper suggested that the Egyptian part of the Brotherhood is not particularly extreme and that the broader international movement is hard to generalize about.

"The term 'Muslim Brotherhood'...is an umbrella term for a variety of movements, in the case of Egypt, a very heterogeneous group, largely secular, which has eschewed violence and has decried Al Qaeda as a perversion of Islam," Clapper said. "They have pursued social ends, a betterment of the political order in Egypt, et cetera.....In other countries, there are also chapters or franchises of the Muslim Brotherhood, but there is no overarching agenda, particularly in pursuit of violence, at least internationally."

The Brotherhood uses the slogan, "Islam is the answer," and generally advocates for government in accordance with Islamic principles. The movement has as a broad goal unifying what it perceives as Muslim lands, from Spain to Indonesia, as a "caliphate."

From the people who brought us man made disasters, over seas contingency actions andwho have done everything in their power to disabuse people of the odd notion that there is such a thing as "Islamic terrorism (lets not forget the Ft Hood shooting)comes the perverse and dangerous idea that the Muslim Brotherhood is "largely secular.

February 10, 2011 at 9:12 p.m.
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