published Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Report: Audi wants Mexico, not Chattanooga, plant

Follow us on Twitter for the latest breaking news
  • photo
    Model Heather Park shows off an Audi A6 as reporters visit the Audi booth at the North American International Auto Show in January in Detroit.
    Photo by Dan Henry.
    enlarge photo

A German magazine says Volkswagen’s upmarket brand Audi prefers an assembly plant in Mexico rather than using VW’s new Chattanooga factory.

Manager Magazin said Audi Chief Executive Rupert Stadler wants a new factory in Mexico to produce the sport utility vehicle Q5.

But, the report said it was still unclear if Stadler would have his way in the face of opposition from some of Volkswagen's top managers, who want Audi to make use of the new Chattanooga factory.

The Chattanooga plant this spring started production of an all-new midsize Passat. The Enterprise South industrial park plant has capacity to make 150,000 vehicles a year.

The magazine said a decision could be made as early as this October.

Audi does not have its own factory in the United States.

about Staff Report...

Get breaking news from the Times Free Press on Twitter at www.twitter.com/timesfreepress or by visiting us on Facebook or Twitter at the right:

15
Comments do not represent the opinions of the Chattanooga Times Free Press, nor does it review every comment. Profanities, slurs and libelous remarks are prohibited. For more information you can view our Terms & Conditions and/or Ethics policy.
nucanuck said...

The US is sending many well trained workers back to Mexico who could make a great work force for Audi.

July 20, 2011 at 3:30 p.m.
noapathy said...

That's funny PR...they would have exactly the same standards there as they would have in Chattanooga and probably more Americans working there than Mexicans. VW Chattanooga members go down there to help build Jettas all the time! It's not different than our plant, standard wise. All of the same things are in place, they demand excellence no matter where it's assembled. That was a very ignorant statement for you to make!

July 20, 2011 at 3:58 p.m.
Salsa said...

Actually, many cars built in Mexico have proven to be more reliable than many cars built in the USA.

July 20, 2011 at 4:12 p.m.
bigbearzzz said...

DUH...CHEAP LABOR..WHY NOT BUILD UR PLANT IN MEXICO?

July 20, 2011 at 4:30 p.m.
harrystatel said...

You mean public art, excellent public schools, honest government, and The Muticultural Chamber wasn't enough for them? Amazing!

July 20, 2011 at 4:39 p.m.

Probably 'profit' interests on the part of Audi (to locate in low paying Mexico) as well as harrystatel's observations.

Anyone reading most any thread/posts about the problems in the scenic would run (not walk) away, before planting roots with any mid or large company. A racially polarized snake pit at times, thieving politicians, insane/unqualified school board and ahhhhhhh the good old boy mentality.

July 20, 2011 at 7 p.m.
whitelie said...

Im glad they are going with Mexico,These rednecks don't deserve another car plant,Even if its in the same building as the VW plant.

July 20, 2011 at 7:08 p.m.
fairmon said...

Tariffs have never worked They further distort out trade balance. Made in America helps and provides American jobs but VW or Audi profits all go back to Germany just like foreign based U.S. businesses with a facility in another country increases their wealth. Congress favors financial and similar services with most paying no or very little tax and rape most of those doing what is considered middle class jobs, traditional manufacturing. The number of jobs leaving this country is not something any politician wants to talk about.

Recommend to any member of congress that all tax manipulation tools they use be abolished and require all businesses to pay a flat 15-20% on profits. Back up and get a shovel they will talk at length saying nothing. Most won't even acknowledge that any cost imposed by congress, state government or local becomes part of the price consumers pay. It is a hidden tax that hits those with lower incomes worse.

Tax on a gallon of gas is .50 cents a gallon. A worker making $24,000 a year buying 40 gallon a week pays $240 gas tax a year. That equals 1% of income. The cost to someone with A $240,000 income buying the same amount is only one tenth of one percent of their income. The same applies to universal calling tax on the phone bill, buying a car with the hidden tax imposed on businesses affects the lower wage earner more, tax on groceries if they buy similar amounts.

The solution could be house bill H.R. 25 that abolishes all business and income tax, employee receives 100% of wages earned. A national consumer tax is included in every retail purchase. everyone gets a prebate to assist those with lower incomes, they have all their income to spend. The wealthy and politicians are fighting it big time.

fairtax.org

July 20, 2011 at 7:15 p.m.
328Kwebsite said...

Many of Volkswagon's workers who arrived to start up the Chattanooga plant had rotated through VW factory start-ups in Mexico and China before coming here.

Among their gripes? That workers and support contractors in Mexico and China complained less. That they could effectively use the metric system. Failure to understand European use of commas as decimal point notations have been among their gripes.

These are the kind of mistakes that make us look illiterate.

Other complaints? Lazy supply delivery. Blaming the other guy, and then taking the rest of the day off. Parts not arriving on time. Basically, politico golfing instead of nut-and-bolt delivery.

Those were the mistakes that made us look lazy.

We could look at this a couple of ways. Maybe Audi is going through the same global supply pattern that other large auto makers are using. Maybe they passed us over for the same reasons we're only now, after over a 100 years of automotive history, getting a car factory.

Maybe we could splurge on some math and science in schools. Oh, wait, I forgot. We only pay for politicians to pay themselves. We need to be sure to skip paying for school.

If you want big car manufacturers to come here, you have to pay enough for education to make sure that everyone can read a tape measure and do arithmetic. We're not doing that. Instead, we get "slaves learned to read" and withholding PILOT money for schools and Metro Payoff Club conspiracy schemes to appoint another rich Republican to another $125,000 a year job.

If you want to be successful, stop watching Republican opinion shows on TV and start using the library. Read the books when you get there.

You'll have to browse the shelves because Mayor Ron Littlefield's money saving El Cheapo Internet Card Catalog doesn't reflect what's actually in the library. So, to just check out a book, you'll need to pass the Republican Cheapskate IQ test.

We can't cash in if everyone's stuck on stupid. Get yourself smart and shed your dependency on these politico cronies who are doing a horrible job of serving our local people.

Bring success here yourself. All the Littlefields and Coppingers and Kinseys and Corkers have done is bring themselves some money. It's up to us to fix and lead this city and county.

July 20, 2011 at 7:37 p.m.
patricedyal said...

"Auto Insurance Clearance" will give you a break if you buy two or more types of insurance. You may also get a reduction if you have more than one vehicle insured with the same company.

July 21, 2011 at 5:21 a.m.
KennyRogers said...

If Audi wants a new plant to build their new car which is the Q5 then I don't mind if they want to go to Mexico. All I want is to see a good car coming from them. Make the Q5 awesome. Install some nice parts on it like a good Brake Pads, engines and reliable car accessories.

October 20, 2011 at 3:15 a.m.
please login to post a comment

Other National Articles

videos »         

photos »         

e-edition »

advertisement
advertisement

Find a Business

400 East 11th St., Chattanooga, TN 37403
General Information (423) 756-6900
Copyright, Permissions, Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy, Ethics policy - Copyright ©2014, Chattanooga Publishing Company, Inc. All rights reserved.
This document may not be reprinted without the express written permission of Chattanooga Publishing Company, Inc.