published Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Haslam: Curfew, arrests, necessary for safety

State Police arrest Occupy Nashville protestors early Friday morning Oct. 28, 2011 at the site where a few dozen Wall Street protesters have been encamped for about three weeks. Authorities began moving in early Friday using a newly enacted state policy that set a curfew for the grounds near the state Capitol, including Legislative Plaza where the protesters had been staying in tents. (AP Photo/JOHN PARTIPILO\ - THE TENNESSEAN)
State Police arrest Occupy Nashville protestors early Friday morning Oct. 28, 2011 at the site where a few dozen Wall Street protesters have been encamped for about three weeks. Authorities began moving in early Friday using a newly enacted state policy that set a curfew for the grounds near the state Capitol, including Legislative Plaza where the protesters had been staying in tents. (AP Photo/JOHN PARTIPILO\ - THE TENNESSEAN)
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press.
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Gov. Bill Haslam says a curfew and the arrests of dozens of Occupy Nashville protesters was an attempt to make the grounds around the state Capitol safe.

The Republican governor spoke with reporters today, a day after state officials agreed to stop enforcing the curfew.

The protesters went to federal court on Monday seeking a temporary restraining order against Haslam, arguing the curfew and arrests violated their rights to free speech and freedom of assembly.

State Attorney General’s Office Senior Counsel Bill Marett announced at the beginning of the hearing that the state would not fight efforts to halt the policy.

Haslam said today that the non-action was not an admittance of a mistake, but simply an agreement to a temporary restraining order.

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Joyanna said...

Oh really? Then why doesn't Nashville send its storm troopers into high-crime areas of the city where safety is an actual concern? Occupy Nashville certainly did not represent a danger. No, Gov. Haslam is merely concerned to be seen by his corporate patrons as maintaining the minimal order necessary for the conduct of business. Can't let democracy get in the way of commerce.

November 1, 2011 at 12:27 p.m.
John_Proctor said...

Haslam was elected Governor not President for Life or Fearless Leader. I suggest that he have one of his minions read the First Amendment to him and concentrate real closely on the part about "peaceful assembly." He may not like the occupiers or their cause but our esteemed governor had no legal grounds for his order. His action was a mistake even if he lacks the candor or testicular appendages to admit it.

The Nashville magistrate, who refused to sign arrest warrants that were based on a lack of probable cause, deserves a lot of praise for his stand. We don't live in a police state yet but give Ron Ramsey and his ilk enough time and I am sure that they can reverse that statement.

November 1, 2011 at 2:06 p.m.
My2centsworth said...

I will defend (as I have) the rights of a U.S. Citizen to practice these rights under the U.S. Constitution. But . . . Occupying a public area creating unsafe and unsanitary conditions in this public area is not a good thing. Peaceful Assembly does not mean to homestead on public land. Why these people were ever allowed to stay the first night is beyond me. If it were up to me I would say -- if they all were not up and moving, speech-a-fying, chanting, whatever then they must move along. Absolutely no camping on public land without a permit, no fires, no consumption of alcohol, or loitering, etc. etc. etc. Anyone caught sleeping would be considered a vagrant and processed accordingly. Were permits granted for these people to Occupy public land, or for Assembly on this public land? I do not know but if they were granted a permit I doubt that it would have allowed them to assemble this long or erect structures without a break. I have been watching these assemblies popup all over the country and still have not been able to understand a clear message other than they are disgruntled. They speak in generalities with no direction other than disruption and some kind of frustration with someone or something.

Rally and protest all you want BUT go home when everyone else does and take a bath, get some good food, and make your plans there. Be sure to clean up after yourselves, as the city has their own mess to clean up.

Thank you.

USSA is one day closer.

November 1, 2011 at 2:56 p.m.
littlebrains said...

surely this is not the same bill haslem whose company during katrina price gouged for gas at his stores-- and the same man that said said he couldnt be responsible for what the people in his company did-- now he is governor and still afraid of what might happen if people tell the truth... you now must arrest all the homeless people of nashville--- what a doofus just like the mayor of chattanooga--corporate greed is gonna turn this country up on its backside soon proffit is one thing but paying ceo's billions to cut out more and more of the little peoples jobs-- well guess what you stupid idiots when we are broke we dont have money to spend at your greed stops and you will be broke like us but you wont be able to survive because you havent been used to it see you soon

November 1, 2011 at 3:19 p.m.
01centare said...

That's a new one for Haslam. "We're arresting you and trampling upon your 1st amendment rights for your own good." {rolleyes} %>

November 1, 2011 at 5:14 p.m.
jd2011 said...

1 term Governor.

November 1, 2011 at 9:02 p.m.
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