published Monday, February 6th, 2012

Stamp price increase won't rescue U.S. Postal Service

Did you happen to notice that the price of first-class postage went up by 1 cent recently -- from 44 cents to 45 cents?

If you didn't, it may be because, like millions of other Americans, you have been relying more on email and the Internet -- and less on slower, traditional stamp-and-envelope mail -- to pay bills and keep in touch with friends and family.

That shift to the Internet has cost the U.S. Postal Service billions of dollars in revenue, which has prompted the increase in stamp prices.

But even with that extra revenue, it's doubtful the Postal Service will be able to drop a current proposal to close potentially thousands of post offices nationwide, including Chattanooga facilities in Alton Park, East Brainerd and Highland Park.

We regret the jobs that will be lost, but propping up services that the American people simply are not using very much is no alternative.

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conservative said...

The speedier car replaced the horse and buggy, the speedier internet will replace the Post Office. It's just progress.

An added benefit will be more union job losses.

February 6, 2012 at 2:16 p.m.

You want your government to lose an avenue of communicating with you that isn't in the hands of a third-party?

I think you're closer to China than you think.

Here's a hint, they let people get control over the information infrastructure too. Can't let folks get in the habit of expecting communication to be open and accessible.

February 6, 2012 at 5:42 p.m.
rolando said...

Funny. I can't recall the last time I received a snail-mail letter from the government that didn't include some form of bad news...and a threat...along with a sprinkling of the good to sweeten it up a bit. Virtually all such "letters" contain a threat of some kind, usually involving perjury or false statements [including the penalty]...'course that doesn't mean much when our top executives get away with it all the time...but then again, they are effectively above the law, aren't they?

February 6, 2012 at 6:02 p.m.

No, they just bought it and made it do what they want.

Which is not to your benefit if they can help it.

But if you want, we can change it so they mail you all happy news, like North Korea does.

Even if not true.

February 6, 2012 at 7:41 p.m.
rolando said...

That was government executives, newbulbs. They don't need to buy anything...they just make the laws to exclude themselves.

They haven't worked for us for at least 46 years.

"WE" can change it? And exactly how will that happen? More ACORN and/or Black Panther thugs? Or by royal Presidential/Dictatorial fiat?

Even if true.

We are living in interesting times, indeed.

February 6, 2012 at 8:23 p.m.

If you don't think that top executives in private business get away with crimes, then check again, numerous instances of mortgage fraud, a pervasive culture that contaminated comes from the top down. And yes, politicians are glad to sell it to them, because you buy their stories about class warfare and over-regulation, without which, surely we would all be rich, since welfare is about keeping us poor.

I think they'd be using Fox News pundits actually, you were glad to buy them when they were selling Bush's lies. Did you believe Susan G. Komen's ever-changing story too? Or the recent craze over Chrysler?

February 6, 2012 at 9:27 p.m.
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