published Sunday, March 4th, 2012

Public prefers spending cuts to President Obama's tax hikes

The federal government takes in more than $2 trillion a year in taxes but for four years running has spent more than $1 trillion in additional, borrowed money.

That and our $15.3 trillion national debt bear witness to the fact that Congress' problem is too much spending, not too little taxing.

Fortunately, it appears that the American people understand that.

President Barack Obama has sought to stir class envy by suggesting tax hikes on "the rich." But a recent Associated Press-GfK poll found that given a choice between the president's tax increase scheme and cutting federal spending to balance the budget, Americans vastly prefer spending cuts.

Fifty-six percent of respondents said cuts are the way to fix the budget, compared with only 31 percent who favor tax increases.

That is a commonsense rebuke to Obama's class warfare.

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LibDem said...

It's not exactly either/or, but it's only commonsense when the 56% agree on what to cut.

March 4, 2012 at 10:25 a.m.
Plato said...

I was listening to former Bush budget director Bruce Bartlett this morning on CNN and even he commented on how totally absurd is it to think we are going to fill the gap between 16% of GDP in revenue and 24% of GDP in expenditures in cuts alone. Add his opinion to the Simpson/Bowles commission report, and the majority of economists including conservative Mark Zandi and you can plainly see the dishonesty of Republicans running for office promising "free candy" and the gullibility of a big part of the voting base that believes them.

Also not surprisingly this editorial misrepresents the President's budget proposal as being one of tax increases only, when in fact, the President and congressional Democrats have repeatedly advocated a balanced approach including both cuts and revenue increases, with the emphasis on cuts.

March 4, 2012 at 2:43 p.m.
conservative said...

Not only do the American people know that our problem is to much spending but so does Congress. The last time Obamination's laughable budget was voted on in the Senate, it did not even receive one vote from his own party. 0 Demonrats voted for Obamination's budget. The Demoncrat controled Senate hasn't passed a budget in over two years simply because the Demoncrats don't want the American people to see just how much they want to tax them. Harry Reid will not pass one in this election year either for the same reason and what are the chances Reid will even allow a vote on Obamination's most recent proposal?

The Demoncrats will not cut spending and EVERYONE knows it.

March 4, 2012 at 5:26 p.m.
Plato said...

^I have a flash bulletin for you Con, President's do not submit budgets to the congress for a vote. Presidents submit their budget proposals to congress which indicates what they would like to see. The House then passes a budget resolution which goes to the Senate. If it is approved it goes to the president to be signed.

You need a good civics lesson before you tackle such topics again.

March 4, 2012 at 9:27 p.m.
rolando said...

Plato [an iffy login] -- If the House and Senate don't vote on the President's budget he submitted to them for approval/disapproval, exactly what do they do to "pass it", as you say? Flip a coin, do they? Wait until 10PM Christmas Eve, maybe?

March 5, 2012 at 5:09 p.m.
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