Chattanooga A to Z
What makes the Scenic City special
What locals like
Residents describe why they love Chattanooga.
Where we live
A guide to the region’s diverse housing options.
Where we work
From candies to cars, what’s made in Chattanooga.
Where we play
From parks to theaters, there’s lots of entertainment.
Need to know
A resident’s guide for getting by in the Scenic City.
Rossville: City Profile
Article Tools:  Print version
Sunday, March 25, 2012    |   
The John Ross House, built in 1797, is the oldest house in the Chattanooga area and was once home to Chief John Ross, leader of the Cherokees.
The John Ross House, built in 1797, is the oldest house in the Chattanooga area and was once home to Chief John Ross, leader of the Cherokees.
Photo by John Rawlston.

"The John Ross House has a tremendous amount of history. It has more history than anything around."

— Larry Rose, president of the Chief John Ross Association

Location: In Northwest Georgia, just across the state line from Chattanooga

Size: 1.8 square miles

Founded: Officially incorporated on Aug. 25, 1905, but the settlement of Poplar Springs dates back to 1785.

Population: 4,105

Mayor: Teddy Harris.

City Council: Cindy Bradshaw, Rick Buff, Hal Gray Jr., Joyce Wall

Attraction: The home of Chief John Ross, leader of the Cherokees. Built in 1797, the 215-year-old house is the oldest in the Chattanooga area and figured in the history of the Cherokees. It also was used by both sides during the Civil War. Located at 212 Andrews St., it's open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays in June, July and August. Other times, the house is open to groups of 12 or more by reservation. To arrange a tour or join the Chief John Ross Association, the volunteer group that owns and operates the house, call Larry Rose at 706-866-5171.

Schools: Ridgeland High, Rossville Middle, Rossville Elementary, Stone Creek Elementary

Famous residents: Chief John Ross; Lauren Alaina, 2011 "American Idol" TV show runner-up.

Fun fact: Peerless Woolen Mills in Rossville was once the largest single-unit mill in the world.