published Sunday, December 8th, 2013

‘Not All Wear Capes’: Brandon Cawood turns lens on first responders

Brandon Cawood spent about six months photographing area first responders for his “Not All Wear Capes”
show now on display at the Creative Arts Guild in Dalton. He created 12 finished pieces, which were then
used in a calendar and on postcards, which will be sold with proceeds going toward the scholarship program
at the CAG.
Brandon Cawood spent about six months photographing area first responders for his “Not All Wear Capes” show now on display at the Creative Arts Guild in Dalton. He created 12 finished pieces, which were then used in a calendar and on postcards, which will be sold with proceeds going toward the scholarship program at the CAG.
Photo by Contributed Photo /Chattanooga Times Free Press.
  • photo
    Brandon Cawood holds one of the finished photographs, which he describes as looking somewhat like a movie promo poster.
    Photo by Contributed Photo /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

IF YOU GO

* What: “Not All Wear Capes,” photographs by Brandon Cawood.

* When: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday through Dec. 30.

* Where: Creative Arts Guild, 520 W. Waugh St., Dalton, Ga.

* Phone: 706-278-0168.

* Website: www.creativeartsguild.org.

At a photography workshop Brandon Cawood attended more than a year ago, the instructor stressed the idea of doing personal projects. In his case, a photo series that was not a commissioned work — something just for himself.

He decided to do one in honor of first responders. The more he thought about the idea, however, the more he liked it, and he realized it could be something bigger. Not bigger for himself, but for others.

“I thought it might be something beneficial and could raise money for someone,” he said. “I’m a big believer in arts and how important it is. I didn’t want to make money off of it for myself.”

Terry Tomasello, executive director of the Creative Arts Guild in Dalton, Ga., also thought it was a good idea, and now Cawood’s work, “Not All Wear Capes,” a series of 12 photographs, is on display at the CAG through the end of December.

In addition, a calendar and a series of postcards featuring the works have been created, and the money raised from their sale will go to the CAG’s scholarship fund.

“I told Brandon he was a hero himself,” Tomasello said.

Cawood graduated from Northwest Whitfield High School in 2001 and didn’t take up photography until three years ago. His photographs were printed on 24- by 36-inch canvas and placed in 2-inch frames.

The photographs are composites of prearranged images Cawood envisioned. The subjects are first responders in the area, including Dalton firefighters and police officers, SWAT team members from Chattanooga and Georgia state troopers.

One of the works depicting firefighters at work, for example, features almost 40 photos. Cawood said he spent several weeks conceiving and setting up the ideas and then about six months shooting them.

“The colors are pretty vivid,” Cawood said. “I like the idea of the energy and feel of a high-intensity action movie and translating that into photographic form.”

Contact Barry Courter at bcourter@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6281.

about Barry Courter...

Barry Courter is staff reporter and columnist for the Times Free Press. He started his journalism career at the Chattanooga News-Free Press in 1987. He covers primarily entertainment and events for ChattanoogaNow, as well as feature stories for the Life section. Born in Lafayette, Ind., Barry has lived in Chattanooga since 1968. He graduated from Notre Dame High School and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with a degree in broadcast journalism. He previously was ...

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