published Sunday, March 31st, 2013

How to ace your next job interview

Making it to the job interview stage means your skill set and résumé have caught the interest of a potential employer, who now wants to determine if you’ll be a good fit as an employee.

Use the following tips to ensure that you walk away from your job interview and receive either a call back for a second interview or a job offer:

Practice makes perfect

Hundreds of websites provide traditional job interview questions, so think about what kind of answers you’d give for these questions. For example, “What is your worst quality?” could be turned into an opportunity to show your future employer you identify your faults, but are able to recognize opportunities to improve, with examples of how you’ve already taken steps in this direction.

Be yourself

Although the interview is a great time to sell yourself to a potential employer, be careful not to go overboard. Embellishment may be tempting — particularly for young graduates — but employers want to know what you’ve really done. Communicate any career training you have and how it relates to the position.

Be yourself, and in cases where you lack experience, display a willingness and desire to learn the necessary skills.

Every interaction counts

Anyone you encounter within proximity to the interview setting can have a direct influence on its outcome. Having a positive and respectful attitude creates a more welcoming environment and sets you up for success.

Follow up

Good follow-through is important and shows a potential employer that a candidate cares about the opportunity. Be sure to send a note to everyone who interviewed you thanking them for their time and consideration.

— BrandPoint

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