published Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Area couple takes advantage of last chance to say 'I do' on this date: 11-12-13

Angela Wallin and Glenn McCary are marrying today at the Ringgold Wedding Chapel.
Angela Wallin and Glenn McCary are marrying today at the Ringgold Wedding Chapel.
Photo by Tim Barber.
BY THE NUMBERS

Top marriage dates and number of U.S. couples wed on those days.

• 7-7-07: 66,000

• 10-11-12: 4,000

• 12-12-12: 7,500

Source: David’s Bridal

Angela Wallin and Glenn McCary aren't planning a big wedding since it's the second marriage for both, but she says they did want something to make their day distinctive. So they set the date: 11-12-13.

Tuesdays aren't ordinarily a big day for weddings -- those are weekend celebrations -- but today's unique sequence of numbers has made it a popular day to get married. The national chain David's Bridal estimates that more than 2,500 couples across the country will wed today, setting a record for mid-week marriages.

To put the attraction of today's date in perspective: 371 brides chose the second Tuesday of November 2012 to wed, according to the bridal company's statistics.

"When 7-7-07 happened and all of a sudden we had an estimated 66,000 weddings on one day, it caught our attention," says Brian Beitler, executive vice president of David's Bridal, in a news release. "We now monitor weddings that fall on iconic dates, and we see that couples love booking their nuptials using interesting numbers."

Plus, as Wallin points out, today's unusual date makes it easy to remember your anniversary.

Wallin and McCary are marrying at the Ringgold Wedding Chapel, where owner Teresa James says she's gearing up for a busy day.

"We already have six weddings booked. One of those wants to be pronounced Mr. and Mrs. at 1:11 p.m. Any significant number date is always very busy; it's nothing for us to have 20 on those days and that's about what I'm expecting (today). We had 20 on 10-10-10 and 11-11-11."

Susie Holloway, business manager for the Hamilton County Clerks Office, where couples obtain marriage licenses, says she anticipates a larger number of visitors today, but not enough of a rush that she's adding an extra clerk or making other special preparations.

"On 12-12-12, we issued 19 licenses that day, but most people come in beforehand to get their licenses," she explains.

Dates featuring sequential numbers are not just popular for their iconic date, but also for numerological significance. In numerology, 11 is considered a master number because it is a double of the same digit, meaning its attributes are twice as strong. In this case, the numeral one is equated with new beginnings -- appropriate and lucky for a wedding date. Additionally, repeating numbers -- such as 11 or 111 in today's date -- are considered angel numbers, forming a connection between humans and angels.

The lifespan of these sequential dates is numbered -- there's only one left in this century: 12-13-14. "Couples are planning ahead for that," says Haleigh Sherbak, venue director at Stratton Hall on Broad Street. "We've already had two calls for 12-13-14."

After that, sequential dates won't roll around again until Jan. 2, 2103, or 1-2-3.

Contact Susan Pierce at spierce@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6284.

about Susan Pierce...

Susan Palmer Pierce is a reporter and columnist in the Life department. She began her journalism career as a summer employee 1972 for the News Free Press, typing bridal announcements and photo captions. She became a full-time employee in 1980, working her way up to feature writer, then special sections editor, then Lifestyle editor in 1995 until the merge of the NFP and Times in 1999. She was honored with the 2007 Chattanooga Woman of ...

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