published Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Score one for Hollywood: International Film Music Festival is this weekend - Feb. 28-March 2

Movie poster from “Singin’ in the Rain.” The 1952 film starred, from left, Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald
O’Connor.
Movie poster from “Singin’ in the Rain.” The 1952 film starred, from left, Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor.
Photo by Staff File Photo /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

IF YOU GO

■ What: Chattanooga International Film Music Festival.

■ When: Friday-Sunday, Feb. 28-March 2.

■ Where: Majestic 12, 311 Broad St., and Tivoli Theatre, 709 Broad St.

■ Admission: $195 general, $50 students for the weekend (includes reception, movie screening, two concerts, open rehearsals and panel discussions); $95 for CSO patrons who have purchased concert tickets already; $30 for Saturday panel discussions.

■ Phone: 423-267-8583.

■ Website: chattfilmmusic.org.

SCHEDULE

Friday, Feb. 28

8-10 p.m. "Back to the Future" screening and Q&A with composer Alan Silvestri at Majestic 12

Saturday, March 1

9-9:45 a.m. "Musical Choices" with composer Peter Golub, who will present samples of his work and describe the choices he makes when composing for film, at Majestic 12

9:45-10:30 a.m. "Where Does the Music Come From?" with composer George S. Clinton, who will show examples of his work and explain his process of composing for film, from idea inception to final composition, at Majestic 12.

10:45-11:30 a.m. "Why? Where? What? A Composer's Conversation With a Film," with Alan Silvestri, at Majestic 12

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. "Music and Film: The Creative Process," panel discussion with Peter Golub, George S. Clinton, Richard Kaufman and Alan Silvestri, moderated by Doreen Ringer Ross, at Majestic 12

3-5:30pm "Singin' in the Rain" open rehearsal (festival participants only), at Tivoli Theatre

7:30-9:30 p.m. "Singin' in the Rain," with the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera, with Richard Kaufman conducting, at Tivoli Theatre

Sunday, March 2

10-10:45 a.m. "Film/Orchestra Collaboration Q&A," with Richard Kaufman and John Goberman, at Tivoli Theatre

11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. "Hooray for Hollywood" open rehearsal (festival participants only), at Tivoli Theatre

3-5:30 p.m. "Hooray for Hollywood," with the CSO, with Robert Bernhardt, George S. Clinton, Peter Golub and Alan Silvestri conducting works from "Ben Hur," "Captain Blood," "King Kong," Austin Powers, "These Amazing Shadows," "Back to the Future, "Batman," "Lincoln" and "Lord of the Rings," at Tivoli Theatre

Sometimes, the music that accompanies a film or a song that is part of a scene can be as memorable as the action on-screen. Think "Jaws" or "Psycho." And sometimes you might not even be aware of the melody or the notes, but just hearing a violin causes you to suddenly tense, anticipating that the monster is about to jump out from behind a door.

That music didn't appear out of nowhere. Someone had to conceive it, write it and record it, and that someone had to decide not only how it should sound, but where in the action on-screen it appears.

One of the activities at this weekend's Chattanooga International Film Music Festival will be a presentation by composer Alan Silvestri called "Why, Where and What: A Composer's Conversation With a Film."

Silvestri, whose credits include "Back to the Future," will show clips on one of the Majestic 12 screens, pausing the action to ask the type of questions that every composer has to ask, according to George S. Clinton, the festival's artistic adviser and one of its presenting composers.

"He will stop and say, 'Why do we need music here, and what kind should it be and when should it start? Should it start when the door opens or later?' "

Clinton says guests will come away with a better understanding of the process and the realization that the music doesn't just happen.

"I heard Steven Spielberg talking recently about 'Jaws' and the John L. Williams score. They were both young at the time and when John first played that 'duunuuut' on the piano, because they didn't do synthesized mock-ups then, Steven said he thought John was joking with him. Can you imagine the film without it?"

As he did during the inaugural festival last year, Clinton will show scenes from "The Tooth Fairy," which he scored, and take participants along the journey he took to come up with the final soundtrack.

The festival will feature a screening of Silvestri's "Back to the Future," followed by a question-and-answer period. It will also include several panel discussions and two concerts by the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera.

Both are part of their regular season but have been incorporated into the festival as well. The first is "Singin' in the Rain." While the Gene Kelly classic plays on the Tivoli big screen, the CSO will provide the soundtrack live with Richard Kaufman conducting.

"You'll hear Gene Kelly singing, but the symphony will provide the music," Clinton says.

The second is the annual "Hooray for Hollywood" pops concert featuring well-known Hollywood classics, including works by some of the guest composers, who will conduct.

Last year's festival drew people from across the country, as well as from Australia and Canada. Clinton, who is the chair of the Film Scoring Department at Berklee College of Music in Boston, says he expects a similar turnout this year.

KEY PARTICIPANTS

  • photo
    Alan Silvestri's credits include the Back to the Future films, “Romancing the Stone,” “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” “Forrest Gump” (for which he received an Academy Award nomination for Best Score), “Contact,” “What Lies Beneath,” “Cast Away” (for which he won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition) and “The Polar Express.”

■ Alan Silvestri: His credits include the Back to the Future films, "Romancing the Stone," "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," "Forrest Gump" (for which he received an Academy Award nomination for Best Score), "Contact," "What Lies Beneath," "Cast Away" (for which he won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition), "The Polar Express."

■ George S. Clinton: His credits include the Austin Powers films, the Mortal Kombat films, The Santa Clause films, Cheech & Chong's "The Corsican Brothers," "The Tooth Fairy" and "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee."

■ Peter Golub: His credits include "The Great Debaters," "Frozen River," "The Laramie Project" and "Stolen."

  • photo
    Doreen Ringer Ross is vice president film/TV for BMI in Los Angeles and created the Sundance Institute’s Composers Lab and the BMI Film/TV Composers Conducting Workshop.

■ Doreen Ringer Ross: She is vice president film/TV for BMI in Los Angeles and created the Sundance Institute's Composers Lab and the BMI Film/TV Composers Conducting Workshop.

■ Richard Kaufman: He is principal pops conductor of Orange County's Pacific Symphony.

■ John Goberman: The 12-time Emmy Award winner (out of 53 nominations) and three-time Peabody Award winner is perhaps best known as the creator of "Live From Lincoln Center." To produce the television series, he developed the video and audio techniques by which live performances may be telecast without disruption to the performers or audience.

Contact Barry Courter at bcourter@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6354.

about Barry Courter...

Barry Courter is staff reporter and columnist for the Times Free Press. He started his journalism career at the Chattanooga News-Free Press in 1987. He covers primarily entertainment and events for ChattanoogaNow, as well as feature stories for the Life section. Born in Lafayette, Ind., Barry has lived in Chattanooga since 1968. He graduated from Notre Dame High School and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with a degree in broadcast journalism. He previously was ...

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