Houston Antiques Show marks 40th anniversary - Feb. 21

Houston Antiques Show marks 40th anniversary - Feb. 21

February 20th, 2014 by Susan Pierce in Chattnow Outabout

CorningWare is a hot collectible as baby boomers buy items they remember from their childhoods.

Photo by Staff File Photo/Times Free Press.

IF YOU GO

¦ What: 40th Houston Museum Antiques Show & Sale.

¦ When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Feb. 21-22; noon-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23.

¦ Where: Stratton Hall, 3146 Broad St.

¦ Admission: $15 (good all three days); $10 Sunday only.

¦ Phone: 423-267-7176.

¦ Website: www.thehoustonmuseum.org.

¦ Note: Lunch will be available for purchase all three days of the show.

PREVIEW PARTY

Want the first look at the goods? A Preview Party will be held at 7 p.m. today, Feb. 20, at Stratton Hall. The $75 ticket grants admission all three days of the show as well.

DEAN SIX SCHEDULE

¦ Friday: Written glass identifications (limit of five objects per person), 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

¦ Saturday: "A Survey of American Collectible Glass, 1840-1970: Lacy, Victorian, Midcentury and a Wee Bit More," 1 p.m. Lecture followed by written glass identifications, 2-4 p.m.

¦ Sunday: "Tips for New Collectors and What's Hot in Glass Now and Tomorrow," 1 p.m.

North Carolina glass expert Dean Six says he makes fewer than a half-dozen personal appearances a year at antiques shows. One of those is this weekend's Houston Museum Antiques Show & Sale, which opens Friday, Feb. 21, in Stratton Hall and closes Sunday afternoon, Feb. 23.

The antiques show and sale has been a successful fundraiser to pay the museum's operational expenses.

"The Houston Museum is a timeless treasure in Chattanooga," says show chairwoman Kathie Fulghum. "This annual fundraiser -- our 40th -- keeps our doors open for the entire year."

Donna Kidd, dealer chairman, says 15 "carefully selected" dealers will be exhibiting this weekend.

"They were chosen not only for their fine merchandise but their knowledge and integrity as well," she says. "Two are furniture dealers; one carries mostly English furniture, the other carries high-end American country furniture. We have the finest rare book dealer that I have ever encountered. There will be linens, vanity items, fine European and Asian hand-painted porcelain, cut glass, art glass, oil paintings and prints, sterling silver and exquisite jewelry."

Six divides his time between two jobs each month: two weeks as publications and special-projects manager at Replacements Ltd. in Greensboro, N.C., and two as executive director of the Museum of American Glass in West Virginia.

His own glass collection numbers more than 9,000 pieces, he says, but he won't be bringing any of it with him. Instead, he will give written identifications for glass pieces brought in by show visitors as well as two educational talks geared to serious collectors as well as those just starting to collect glass. Six asks that visitors bringing items for identification keep them to five pieces or less, and they must be glass, no china or porcelain.

"We try to capture the public's imagination with special exhibits and presentations and hope we can both entertain and educate," says Amy Autenreith, museum manager. "I've heard Dean speak, and he is a lot of fun. He is very gregarious and knowledgeable."

Contact Susan Pierce at spierce@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6284.