Whitwell man, Glenn Carlton Webster, gets 6 years of probation for sex abuse

Whitwell man, Glenn Carlton Webster, gets 6 years of probation for sex abuse

October 17th, 2012 by Ben Benton in Local Regional News

Glenn Carlton Webster

A Whitwell, Tenn., man charged in June with 45 counts of rape and sexual battery of a teenage boy entered a no-contest plea last week that netted him six years of probation.

Glenn Carlton Webster, 60, of 374 S. Elm St., Whitwell, initially was arrested on an indictment issued June 4 charging him with 15 counts each of statutory rape by an authority figure, aggravated statutory rape and sexual battery by an authority figure in connection with improper relations that started when the boy was 14, Marion County Circuit Court records show.

On Friday, Webster entered the plea to a single count of sexual battery by an authority figure, said Assistant District Attorney Julia Veal, a prosecutor in the 12th Judicial District Attorney's office.

Veal said the plea was the most acceptable situation for the victim's family.

"I'm comfortable with the solution, but I'm certainly not happy," Veal said Tuesday, noting she would have liked to see Webster get jail time.

She said the plea considered the needs and concerns of the family of the now-18-year-old victim, who wants to get on with his life.

The investigation, launched in September 2011, spanned a period of about two years, according to investigators. Webster, a triple amputee known for his participation in Scouting and civic activities, abused the 14-year-old victim from 2008 to 2010, records state.

According to the Oct. 12 plea and attached agreed orders filed on Oct. 16, Webster will be placed on the sex offender registry, qualifying him as a violent sexual offender. But the plea does not require lifelong community supervision.

Terms of Webster's probation will allow Webster's wife, a schoolteacher, to have access to the Internet at home and to allow the couple to communicate via the Web with their adult son who is serving overseas in the military.

Orders state Webster's wife will be allowed "full access to view the defendant's history of his computer use," though Webster is restricted to using the computer for communicating with his son.

Orders also allow Webster to have visitation with his grandchildren as long as their parents approve, records show.