2 Alabama men charged in thefts of ATVs, motorcycles

2 Alabama men charged in thefts of ATVs, motorcycles

February 23rd, 2013 by Ben Benton in Local Regional News

Justin Allen Coffey, 25, of Scottsboro was arrested and charged with two counts of receiving stolen property 1st by Fort Payne Police Department and two counts of receiving stolen property 1st by DeKalb County Sheriff's Office.

Photo by Contributed Photo/Times Free Press.

Robert Tyler Whiting, 19, of Pisgah was arrested and charged with two counts of receiving stolen property 1st by Fort Payne Police Department and two counts of receiving stolen property 1st by DeKalb County Sheriff's Office.

Photo by Contributed Photo/Times Free Press.

Two DeKalb County, Ala., men are charged in connection with the recovery of a dozen stolen all-terrain vehicles and motorcycles, Sheriff Jimmy Harris said Friday.

Justin Allen Coffey, 25, of Scottsboro, and Robert Tyler Whiting, 19, of Pisgah, were charged with two counts of first-degree receiving stolen property by the Fort Payne Police Department and two counts of first-degree receiving stolen property by the DeKalb County Sheriff's Office.

Six ATVs and three motorcycles were recovered early Friday and officers worked to recover three more, according to officials.

Authorities said the vehicles were stolen this year in Jackson County and in Florence, Ala.

All the stolen vehicles have been identified and the owners will be contacted, the sheriff said.

Police from Scottsboro and Fort Payne and deputies from Jackson and DeKalb counties began the recovery Thursday at three locations in DeKalb County and Fort Payne. The vehicles were recovered in Pine Ridge, South Fort Payne and Lookout Mountain, officials said.

Chief Deputy Mike Edmondson said late Friday that investigators still are trying to determine the value of the stolen property.

The sheriff said the investigation is ongoing, more suspects may be identified and more charges are possible.

"I really am glad to have these agencies work with us as well as they do," Harris said in the release. "Criminals often work in different jurisdictions to help in getting rid of stolen property, as they did in this case. Working together helps us stop these operations just like we did here."