Hart: Let's Make Capitalism Cool Again

Hart: Let's Make Capitalism Cool Again

January 6th, 2017 by Ron Hart in Opinion Free Press Commentary

Ron Hart

Ron Hart

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Inside Barack Obama's rhetoric of "income inequality" and "attack the rich," used mainly to sway envy-driven, simple minds, was always a dangerous subtext: Capitalism and entrepreneurs are bad. Trump needs to get us back to our capitalist roots, cut government and start running government like a business.

Now only 3.6 percent of 30-year-olds or younger own stakes in private companies. The figure was 10.6 percent in 1989 when government first started collecting data on this. Gumption atrophies in a generation expecting participation trophies.

Lost on this snowflake generation is the hypocrisy of Hillary Clinton, who vowed to take on the "excesses of capitalism" while demanding $300,000 per speech from corporations. From the Vatican, the pope railed against capitalism in Prada shoes and a $5,000 robe. And actors, while getting $15 million per movie, call corporations "greedy."

To see the abundance that our historically free enterprise system has bestowed on us, compare the U.S. to the rest of the world. Travel to any Third World country with a strong central government and a stranglehold on business, and witness the poverty, crime and misery spawned in places such as Venezuela, North Korea and Cuba.

Politicians are bought and sold. Buying Democrats to vote for Obamacare with the "Louisiana Purchase" and "Cornhusker Kickback," Obama proved this point. The only difference between a politician and a hooker is that there's not one person who would walk up four flights of stairs at 1 a.m. to visit a politician.

Capitalism did not strap us with $20 trillion — and growing — in national debt, borrowed from future generations, to advance destructive dependency political agendas and buy votes. Is that "moral and just"? Businesses hire people, help provide health insurance and other benefits, pay taxes, advertise, support local charities and build the character of a community. Look and see who sponsors your town's Little League teams; those are your town's heroes.

The "evil" oil companies bring the fuel out of the ground and to gas stations, where they make seven cents per gallon. Government takes about 50 cents per gallon for doing nothing, not counting the cost of regulations. Then government taxes the oil companies' seven cents profit at 35 percent. And liberals call oil companies greedy?

Capitalism has the mechanisms to enforce good behavior — quickly. Just ask Tiger Woods. His sponsor, AT&T, withdrew its support when he was caught in multiple affairs, punishing Tiger and thus imposing AT&T's most expensive roaming charge ever. If you get caught with a hooker or you fail at your job, a CEO or an employee is fired. There are consequences to bad behavior in business but not in government. You just get more funding; case in point, the VA.

In Obama's O-merica, no punishment was meted out to Lois Lerner, his IRS operative who targeted his political opponents and "lost" her emails upon subpoena. He did not fire her; in fact, all the IRS folks involved received their full pay, retirement, etc.

Neither Lerner nor anyone else involved in the IRS scandal, Benghazi-gate, the Secret Service hooker scandal, the VA mess or the NSA domestic spying revelations has paid any price. Capitalism rewards risk-taking, imagination, hard work, intellect and honesty; government does not. Under this petulant president, government only rewards loyalty to him.

How, then, is government more moral than business? Government takes money by force from people who are productive and redistributes it to its allies.

Eighty-five percent of federal employee political donations went to Democrats, since they know their cushy jobs will be protected. But there's a new sheriff in town, bureaucrats. Employees know Trump is going to start running government like a business. They are scared, and they should be. Billionaire Trump made his daughter, Ivanka, and her family fly coach on Jet Blue; that should send the signal that he means business.

Contact Ron Hart at Ron@RonaldHart.com, Twitter @RonaldHart or visit RonaldHart.com.

Getting Started/Comments Policy

Getting started

  1. 1. If you frequently comment on news websites then you may already have a Disqus account. If so, click the "Login" button at the top right of the comment widget and choose whether you'd rather log in with Facebook, Twitter, Google, or a Disqus account.
  2. 2. If you've forgotten your password, Disqus will email you a link that will allow you to create a new one. Easy!
  3. 3. If you're not a member yet, Disqus will go ahead and register you. It's seamless and takes about 10 seconds.
  4. 4. To register, either go through the login process or just click in the box that says "join the discussion," type your comment, and either choose a social media platform to log you in or create a Disqus account with your email address.
  5. 5. If you use Twitter, Facebook or Google to log in, you will need to stay logged into that platform in order to comment. If you create a Disqus account instead, you'll need to remember your Disqus password. Either way, you can change your display name if you'd rather not show off your real name.
  6. 6. Don't be a huge jerk or do anything illegal, and you'll be fine.

Chattanooga Times Free Press Comments Policy

The Chattanooga Times Free Press web sites include interactive areas in which users can express opinions and share ideas and information. We cannot and do not monitor all of the material submitted to the website. Additionally, we do not control, and are not responsible for, content submitted by users. By using the web sites, you may be exposed to content that you may find offensive, indecent, inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise objectionable. You agree that you must evaluate, and bear all risks associated with, the use of the Times Free Press web sites and any content on the Times Free Press web sites, including, but not limited to, whether you should rely on such content. Notwithstanding the foregoing, you acknowledge that we shall have the right (but not the obligation) to review any content that you have submitted to the Times Free Press, and to reject, delete, disable, or remove any content that we determine, in our sole discretion, (a) does not comply with the terms and conditions of this agreement; (b) might violate any law, infringe upon the rights of third parties, or subject us to liability for any reason; or (c) might adversely affect our public image, reputation or goodwill. Moreover, we reserve the right to reject, delete, disable, or remove any content at any time, for the reasons set forth above, for any other reason, or for no reason. If you believe that any content on any of the Times Free Press websites infringes upon any copyrights that you own, please contact us pursuant to the procedures outlined in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Title 17 U.S.C. § 512) at the following address:

Copyright Agent
The Chattanooga Times Free Press
400 East 11th Street
Chattanooga, TN 37403
Phone: 423-757-6315
Email: webeditor@timesfreepress.com