Don't confuse physician categories

Don't confuse physician categories

June 24th, 2011 in Opinion Letters

Don't confuse physician categories

If the Times Free Press' "Best of the Best" popularity contest is going to include physician categories (which they shouldn't), they should at least have appropriate categories.

The "Best Cosmetic or Plastic Surgeon" category groups together what are potentially two very distinctly different types of doctors with very different training, certification, expertise, and hospital credentials ... or lack thereof.

The specialty of plastic surgery encompasses both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. A real plastic surgeon is fully trained in both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery of the entire body as evidenced by completion of an accredited plastic surgery training program, certification by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and having hospital privileges in the specialty of plastic surgery.

Therefore, by definition, all plastic surgeons are "cosmetic surgeons."

In contrast, a "cosmetic surgeon" could be any doctor with a medical license who decides to attempt to perform cosmetic plastic surgery procedures, even without any formal training.

Therefore, not all "cosmetic surgeons" are plastic surgeons, or even close.

By combining these two physician categories in the "Best of Best," the public may be misled into thinking that anyone calling themselves a "cosmetic surgeon" has the same extensive training and expertise of a plastic surgeon.

JEANNE A. SCANLAND, M.D., FACS

Board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery

Maybe college not the best choice

There's a very simple solution to the double-digit tuition increases announced by UT and UTC. At the same time, reports were out last week stating that the quality of education from colleges has declined. The answer is, "Don't Go to College."

Colleges have announced outrageous increases every year, and their enrollments have increased. That's foolish! If no one attended for a year, or until tuition rates decreased, then tuition would come down.

I am not trying to be a "community organizer," but the justification for not attending is quite simple - a college education no longer guarantees one a job upon graduation.

At the same time, manufacturing jobs go unfilled in this country because no one attempts a technical education or attends technical institutes.

PIMCO's Bill Gross just included in his last investment commentary a blast against government efforts at job creation while stating that for most young people, a college education is a waste of money.

The bottom line is what's the point of spending $100,000 on tuition at college to secure a degree in liberal arts that might eventually help a graduate secure a job paying $25,000 a year. What a lousy return on investment that is while welding and machinists jobs that pay more go unfilled.

JEFF W. WELLS

Find a better use for Bennett's space

In an era of increased concern for preserving the environment, it is truly regrettable that the Times Free Press finds it necessary to chop down trees in order to produce the paper upon which to print the work of Clay Bennett with his usual politically correct opinions and usual banal artistic style. A far better use of that space in the paper would be to sell advertising instead. This would have the double benefit of the enhanced revenues from the advertising sales, plus the increase to the bottom line by not having to pay Bennett's salary.

LAWRENCE S. NAGLE, M.D

Water proposal has Ramsey prints

When I heard Gov. Haslam's plan to discuss with Georgia Gov. Deal a water transfer out of the Tennessee River to Georgia in exchange for access to Atlanta airport via high speed train and the Savannah port, I thought this has Claude Ramsey's political tactics all over it.

About nine years ago, Ramsey orchestrated a deal between TDEC and Eastside Utilities to transfer water out of the Tennessee River to Dalton Utilities, a utility frequently fined by EPA. The deal was kept from the public until the public hearing. However, the water lines had already been run to Cleveland and down the Dalton Highway. The meeting was a waste of time ... the deal was done.

Ramsey has never been a good steward of our natural resources. And Eastside Utilities has the lines to run the water right to Dalton and on to Atlanta.

This trade of our water for this "access" is a token measure. It would take years for this train to become a reality. Millions of gallons will flow while we wait on "access." Future generations will pay dearly.

Anyone who enjoys the "Big T" had better wake up and voice your opposition to Sens. Corker and Alexander. The "Big T" is our most important natural resource. Protect it - it's all we've got.

MICHAEL McCLURE