Collins: Paging the Trump Armada

Collins: Paging the Trump Armada

April 21st, 2017 by Gail Collins, The New York Times in Opinion Times Commentary

In a photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS Carl Vinson leads the USS Michael Murphy and Lake Champlain, while underway in the Indian Ocean on April 14, 2017. South Koreans felt bewildered and cheated by news that the Carl Vinson was not in fact en route to the region, as the Trump administration had claimed during heightened tensions with North Korea.

Photo by MC3 DANNY KELLEY

Let's consider the case of the wrong-way warships.

Last week, North Korea was planning a big celebration in honor of its founder's birthday. For North Koreans, holiday fun is short on barbecues and high on weaponry. The big parade in Pyongyang featured monster canisters that theoretically contained intercontinental ballistic missiles. It's possible they were actually empty and that right now, North Korea only has bragging rights in the big-container race.

But its intentions were definitely bad, and the United States was worried there might be a missile launch or an underground nuclear test.

What should Donald Trump do? "We're sending an armada," said the president. Possible confrontation? As a concerned citizen, you had to be very worried. North Korea is, in every way, a special and dangerous case. It has a leader who is narcissistic to the point of psychosis, with a celebrity fixation and a very strange haircut.

OK, maybe not entirely unique.

Trump was talking about bringing in four warships, one of them an aircraft carrier. Was this going to mean real shooting? His critics back home had to decide whether to protest, wave the flag in support or simply stock the fallout shelter.

Yet, as Mark Landler and Eric Schmitt reported in The Times, at the moment the president was announcing his armada, the warships in question were actually going in the opposite direction, en route to a destination 3,500 miles away, where they were to take part in joint exercises with the Australian navy.

Whoops. The official response was that the administration was sending an armada — eventually.

"We said that it was heading there. And it was heading there, it is heading there," press secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday.

Poor Sean Spicer. Every day a new official fantasy to defend.

But about the missing warships. It's possible Trump was bluffing, which certainly sounds like a bad idea. After all, if this administration has a strong card in foreign policy, it's that the rest of the world thinks he's so crazy he might do anything. It seems more likely that the administration just screwed up, and some people thought the warships had been rerouted when they really weren't.

We're really not asking for a lot, but can't the president at least be clear about the direction our ships are headed? Concerned citizenry has already adapted to the idea that half the things Trump said during the campaign have now been retracted. NATO is great, the Chinese don't manipulate their currency. And the Export-Import Bank is, well

Pop Quiz: Which best describes your feelings about the president's attitude toward the Export-Import Bank?

A) Happy when he denounced it during the campaign.

B) Glad when he said it was a good thing after all.

C) Worried when he nominated an Export-Import Bank head who seems to hate it.

D) I don't care about the Export-Import Bank! What about all those bombs?

OK, OK. In the end, the North Koreans did test a missile but it exploded right after launch. It is possible this was due to a long-running American cybersabotage program. If so, Trump couldn't have mentioned it as a matter of security. Otherwise he'd certainly have been out there expressing his gratitude to the Obama administration for having done so much work on it. Hehehehe.

When it comes to Trump and foreign affairs, the big problem is that you want to be fair, but you don't want to encourage him. A lot of Americans liked the idea of responding to a chemical attack in Syria by bombing a Syrian air base. But if the president thought it was popular, wouldn't he get carried away? It's like praising a 4-year-old for coloring a picture, and the next thing you know he's got his crayons out, heading for the white sofa.

What we want to do is take the crayons away and murmur: "Good boy. Now why don't you go off and nominate some ambassadors for a change?"

And go find your boats.

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