Scientist Rick Gaitskell, a physics professor at Brown University, talks about the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D. The lab's experiments will include the world's most sensitive dark-matter detector. Gaitskell says that he's been hunting for dark matter for 23 years, and that the lab — housed inside the now-shuttered Homestake Gold Mine nearly 5,000 feet beneath the earth — could help scientists understand the origins of the universe.
Scientist Rick Gaitskell, a physics professor at Brown University, talks about the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D. The lab's experiments will include the world's most sensitive dark-matter detector. Gaitskell says that he's been hunting for dark matter for 23 years, and that the lab — housed inside the now-shuttered Homestake Gold Mine nearly 5,000 feet beneath the earth — could help scientists understand the origins of the universe.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Wednesday, May 30th, 2012
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LEAD, S.D. — Nestled nearly 5,000 feet beneath the earth in the gold boom town of Lead, S.D., is a laboratory that could help scientists answer some pretty heavy questions about life, its origins and the universe.

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