Corie "Uni" Davis talks during a group support session for gunshot survivors in Washington. The District of Columbia, which in 1991 recorded 479 homicides, now stands at 74 and is on pace to finish the year with fewer than 100 murders for the first time since the late 1950s.
Corie "Uni" Davis talks during a group support session for gunshot survivors in Washington. The District of Columbia, which in 1991 recorded 479 homicides, now stands at 74 and is on pace to finish the year with fewer than 100 murders for the first time since the late 1950s.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Friday, November 23rd, 2012
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WASHINGTON — The crack epidemic that began in the 1980s ushered in a wave of bloodletting in the nation’s capital and a death toll that ticked upward daily. Dead bodies, sometimes several a night, had homicide detectives hustling between crime scenes and earned Washington unwelcome monikers such as the nation’s “murder capital.” At the time, some feared the murder rate might ascend to more frightening heights.

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