Canoes stand tied close to Chin Kite Kyunn, or Mosquito Bite Island, in Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar. Isolated for decades by the country’s former military regime and piracy, the Mergui archipelago is thought by scientists to harbor some of the world’s most important marine biodiversity and looms as a lodestone for those eager to experience one of Asia’s last tourism frontiers before, as many fear, it succumbs to the ravages that have befallen many of the continent’s once pristine seascapes.
Canoes stand tied close to Chin Kite Kyunn, or Mosquito Bite Island, in Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar. Isolated for decades by the country’s former military regime and piracy, the Mergui archipelago is thought by scientists to harbor some of the world’s most important marine biodiversity and looms as a lodestone for those eager to experience one of Asia’s last tourism frontiers before, as many fear, it succumbs to the ravages that have befallen many of the continent’s once pristine seascapes.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Friday, March 21st, 2014
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MERGUI ARCHIPELAGO, Myanmar — Where the Indian Ocean rolls toward Myanmar's southwestern coast, a lacework of 800 islands rises, fringed with shimmering beaches of no footprints.

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