Mark Desire, left, assistant director for forensic biology at the office of chief medical examiner, visits as criminalist trainees as they prepare sample bone fragments for DNA testing at the training lab in New York. With new technology yielding results impossible a dozen years ago, forensic scientists are still trying to match the bone with DNA from those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and have never been identified.
Mark Desire, left, assistant director for forensic biology at the office of chief medical examiner, visits as criminalist trainees as they prepare sample bone fragments for DNA testing at the training lab in New York. With new technology yielding results impossible a dozen years ago, forensic scientists are still trying to match the bone with DNA from those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and have never been identified.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Friday, May 9th, 2014
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NEW YORK — Thousands of vacuum-sealed plastic pouches filled with bits of bone rest in a Manhattan laboratory. These are the last unidentified fragments of the people who died in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

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