Are congressional pensions too generous?

95%

Say Yes

(619 votes)

 

4%

Say No

(31 votes)

 

650 total votes

1
comments
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GrannyBrenda said...

Our Founding Fathers did not envision those people elected to represent our citizens to be career politicians, retiring from office after decades of service. Our elected officials were civic minded individuals who were willing to devote a few years of their lives to government service, and then return to their civilian lives and livelihoods. This way, we would have fresh minds and ideas and the burden of government service would be shared. You cannot compare Congressional elected service with other federal support employees and the military, who have selected a career path and are much like their civilian counterparts in this respect. There are no retirement benefits for military personnel after five years, as there can be with Members of Congress. Military members must devote at least twenty years of service before they can look forward to retirement benefits. Members of Congress should not be encouraged to make politics and elected government office their career. They should contribute to Social Security and the have the opportunity to contribute to a retirement plan, such as 401k, just as the ordinary citizen does. The ordinary citizen is considered lucky, indeed, if he has the benefit of a 401k plan.

July 16, 2011 at 10:21 a.m.
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