I77Medic's comment history

I77Medic said...

Dr. "ABCD":

I'm a paramedic, not a neurologist.

Please let me know the percentage of stroke patients who receive these treatments in the US, and the percentage of total patients discharged without disability.

Also, let me know if, as Stanford research suggests, time is much less important than finding the right patients for the treatments.

Dr. Fesmire, and you, are the ones providing misleading medical information, telling people that all they need to do when they have stroke symptoms is rush, panicked, to the the nearest emergency room or urgent care and the clot will dissolve before everyone's eyes.

Dr. Fesmire is backing up a coworker, at least. What's your excuse?

June 23, 2010 at 6:01 p.m.
I77Medic said...

Dr. "ABCD":

I'm a paramedic, not a neurologist.

Please let me know the percentage of stroke patients who receive these treatments in the US, and the percentage of total patients discharged without disability.

Also, let me know if, as Stanford research suggests, time is much less important than finding the right patients for the treatments.

Dr. Fesmire, and you, are the ones providing misleading medical information, telling people that all they need to do when they have stroke symptoms is rush, panicked, to the the nearest emergency room or urgent care and the clot will dissolve before everyone's eyes.

Dr. Fesmire is backing up a coworker, at least. What's your excuse?

June 23, 2010 at 6 p.m.
I77Medic said...

If Mr. Wright was truly knowledgeable about stroke he would know that his actions created more risk to himself, his wife and the public than her self-resolved condition posed.

The therapies for stroke that Dr. Fesmire mentions in his letter are rarely used. They have great risk and little success. Time is important, but so is public safety.

Dr. Fesmire doesn't mention that these therapies aren't available at all hospitals, so families who self-diagnose and rush to a hospital in a private car for the sake of speed may learn that their mistake has prevented their loved one from receiving the time sensitive treatment.

There is no indication in Dr. Fesmire's letter or in anything published, including statements by the couple themselves, that any medical treatment at all was given.

If a couple who weren't hospital employees behaved this way, calling ahead with the horn sounding, running into the ED screaming about strokes with a policeman in foot pursuit behind them, I guarantee there would be no letter of support from an ED physcian, just rolled eyes and knowing smiles...and somebody would have asked "why didn't you call an ambulance."

Our choices in a medical emergency are to call 911, or to drive the patient to the hospital within the law.

June 22, 2010 at 6 a.m.
I77Medic said...

If Mr. Wright was truly knowledgeable about stroke he would know that his actions created more risk to himself, his wife and the public than her self-resolved condition posed.

The therapies for stroke that Dr. Fesmire mentions in his letter are rarely used. They have great risk and little success. Time is important, but so is public safety.

Dr. Fesmire doesn't mention that these therapies aren't available at all hospitals, so families who self-diagnose and rush to a hospital in a private car for the sake of speed may learn that their mistake has prevented their loved one from receiving the time sensitive treatment.

There is no indication in Dr. Fesmire's letter or in anything published, including statements by the couple themselves, that any medical treatment at all was given.

If a couple who weren't hospital employees behaved this way, calling ahead with the horn sounding, running into the ED screaming about strokes with a policeman in foot pursuit behind them, I guarantee there would be no letter of support from an ED physcian, just rolled eyes and knowing smiles...and somebody would have asked "why didn't you call an ambulance."

Our choices in a medical emergency are to call 911, or to drive the patient to the hospital within the law.

June 22, 2010 at 5:59 a.m.
I77Medic said...

According to Dr. Frances Fesmire of the Erlanger Emergency Department, calling an ambulance when you think someone is having a stroke wastes time.

So, like "nurse technician" Eric Wright did, just throw your loved one in the car, turn on your roadside flashers, beep the horn, and run red lights on the way to the hospital...while talking on your cell phone.

If police try to stop you, just continue running red lights and ignore their orders. It's okay, Dr. Fesmire will write you a supportive letter.

Of course, Frances Fesmire doesn't really want YOU to act this way...just people he works with.

June 22, 2010 at 4:25 a.m.
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