joe's comment history

joe said...

If only the folks who are always crying 'socialism' knew what the hell they're talking about. If you think this country is socialist, you need to go back to school and re-read your history because you are clue-less. Having a social safety net, is not socialism. Its good governance. Its meant to be a floor that stops people from falling through to the naked abyss of abject poverty. And what banks and the investing class did during the last 10 years is not 'noble capitalism', but a naked rape of the economic system and with it your jobs and now worthless pensions.

October 30, 2011 at 11:44 a.m.
joe said...

As many progressives noted at the time of the passing of the original stimulus plan, the heavy reliance of tax breaks was an inefficient way for the stimulus money to have the most impact. However, it still managed to help many states to keep their employees on the payroll. When that money ran out, so did most of those folks jobs. The reason it can be argued that the plan 'failed' was because it was all Obama could get through Congress. If it had gone through as originally envisioned, the impact would have been greater and more long lasting. The fact that state employees are utilizing foods stamps is the best argument I have ever heard of for a 'living wage.'

October 30, 2011 at 11:37 a.m.
joe said...

What was the problem that tis legislative "fix" was supposed to address in the first place? To date no one has cited any evidence to back up their contention of widespread voter fraud that required this 'solution.' This was, and is, a blatant attempt to control (read: reduce) Democratic (capital 'd') voter participation.

October 16, 2011 at 1:41 p.m.
joe said...

Is this a story or a corporate press release? if the latter, label it such.

October 16, 2011 at 1:34 p.m.
joe said...

Yet another willfully ignorant column by Monsieur Barrett. Too bad you spend so much time, vainly, trying to be clever instead of insightful. If you've actually read anything that the Occupy Wall Street folks have put out you might not come off sounding like such as ass-wipe, but again, one can only hope. While it may be a vain hope, please allow me to try to enlighten you. The political system in this country is broken. Powerful interests run roughshod over those less powerful. And yes, I know that's the way of the world. But it doesn't mean we have to behave like sheep and blindly accept it. Revolutions begin when people get fed up with the status quo, ask the Tea bagger folks, they'll tell you the same thing. It just so happens that folks on the other side are speaking up. Get used to it there's more coming. While you try to put down the 'demands' that you've managed to dredge up, you ignore the context from which they arise. I don't have the space to refute all your points, which I doubt you'd read, and I am confident I can, I'll choose just a couple. The notion of a free college education is a way to invest in our country. The U.S. is falling behind in the battle to educate our own people to countries that heavily invest in their education system. Part of our problem is the insanely high cost of a higher education. Many so-called leaders and opinion makers don't have a problem investing in a new football stadium, but balk at subsidizing higher education. I don't know about you, but I think that's wrong and ultimately detrimental. Our private health insurance system has succeeded in creating the most expensive health care system in the world. Yet one where millions are shut out because of the cost. We're innovative, yes, but I can't afford most of the treatments protocols out there, and neither can most Americans. Personally, I don't consider that the 'best health care system' in the world. While many folks on the Right malign Canada, and it does have its share or problem, basic access isn't one of those problems. If you need a tummy tuck, well, you might have a wait on your hands. Not in the U.S. of course, but again that's not my priority. I leave you with those two counter arguments, and one other plea. Try doing 'some' research before you put pen to paper, or fingertips to key pad. Whatever floats your boat.

October 16, 2011 at 12:08 p.m.
joe said...

So I guess "MountainJoe" and "Rosebud" must be fans of Rhonda Thurman with all the personal, ad hominem attacks they have launched at Superintendent Scales. Be that as it may, their motivations are their own business. However, Scales would do the citizens of Hamilton County a large favor by not returning any of the "golden parachute" he is supposed to receive. The "favor" is highlighting the reckless action of the school board in purely monetary terms. Forcing someone out, only to be obligated to pay them, and then his successor is fiscal insanity, especially in times of budget deficits. These decisions and the motivations for them, should be laid bare for all Hamilton County residents to see and more importantly, vote on. Throw these bums out, I say.

July 4, 2011 at 10:48 a.m.
joe said...

“What do they want? I don’t think suburban students have been treated fairly,” she said. “Poor people learn. Slaves learned to read. I don’t know why poor people can’t learn to read and write. I have a lot of poor people in my family, but they are still expected to learn.” (-District 1 school board member Rhonda Thurman)

Who's the "they" in this comment by Thurman? Is she referring to those uppity Black people who live in Chattanooga? Who have dealt with substandard funding and substandard facilities for generations? And who, except for someone who is politically tone deaf, cites "slaves" in an argument in this day and age?

Comments like this by elected officials in public service should send shivers down the spine of Volkswagen and all those international businesses that have recently moved here. Because it says volumes about the mindset of the elected leaders who run our institutions.

All you need do is replace the adjectives "suburban" with "White" and "poor" with "Black" and you better understand the perspective of the current school board majority. This is a battle of perceived grievance, a sense of entitlement and race. Its coarse argument and ultimately, a self destructive one.

In a growing international economy and internationalized work force this provincialism in the school system, that punishes "outsiders" as Thurman has described Scales and rewards lesser qualified "locals" should be quite the eye-opener, especially as Chattanooga tries to remake its local economy into a more outward, international and viable economic engine. It means there are powerful forces who will fight you tooth and nail to keep the "outsiders", and more importantly, the best qualified candidates, out. Clearly the 800lb. gorilla in the room is still race, regionalism, partisan politics and the "good 'ol boy network." I wonder how that's going to affect the bottom line?

July 3, 2011 at 10:01 a.m.
joe said...

“What do they want? I don’t think suburban students have been treated fairly,” she said. “Poor people learn. Slaves learned to read. I don’t know why poor people can’t learn to read and write. I have a lot of poor people in my family, but they are still expected to learn.” (-District 1 school board member Rhonda Thurman)

Who's the "they" in this comment by Thurman? Is she referring to those uppity Black people who live in Chattanooga? Who have dealt with substandard funding and substandard facilities for generations? And perhaps more interestingly, who, in this day and age, is still referring back to "slaves" to make their political arguments?

Comments like this by elected officials in public service should send shivers down the spine of Volkswagen and all those international businesses that have recently moved here. Because it says volumes about the mindset of the elected leaders who run our institutions.

All you need do is replace the adjectives "suburban" with "White" and "poor" with "Black" and you better understand the perspective of the current school board majority. This is a battle of perceived grievance, a sense of entitlement and race. Its coarse argument and ultimately, a self destructive one.

In a growing international economy and internationalized work force this provincialism in the school system, that punishes "outsiders" as Thurman has described Scales and rewards lesser qualified "locals" should be quite the eye-opener, especially as Chattanooga tries to remake its local economy into a more outward, international and viable economic engine. It means there are powerful forces who will fight you tooth and nail to keep the "outsiders", and more importantly, the best qualified candidates, out. Clearly the 800lb. gorilla in the room is still race, regionalism, partisan politics and the "good 'ol boy network." I wonder how that's going to affect the bottom line?

July 3, 2011 at 9:14 a.m.
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