Lobbyists had busy year in Nashville

NASHVILLE - Special interests this year spent millions of dollars seeking to influence the Tennessee General Assembly on issues ranging from a proposed cap on personal injury lawsuit awards to letting grocery stores sell wine, records show.

Fights in these and other areas, including education policy and telecommunications competition, often played out not only in committee rooms and on the House and Senate floor but behind the scenes in lawmakers' offices, legislative corridors and sometimes lavish receptions for lawmakers.

Groups also spent money in more public ways with studies, telemarketing campaigns and advertising aimed at encouraging the public to pressure legislators.

In the view of Sen. Andy Berke, D-Chattanooga: "Special interests play an outsized role in our government and especially in our legislature."

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"Obviously, what we do affects wholesale industries, but it's difficult not to look at what goes on in the legislature and worry about the individual citizen having his proper say, also," Berke said.

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