Not so fast: California's last nuke plant might run longer

FILE - The Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, south of Los Osos, Calif., is viewed Sept. 20, 2005. California's last operating nuclear power plant could get a second lease on life. Owner Pacific Gas & Electric decided six years ago to close the twin-domed power plant by 2025. But Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, who was involved in the agreement to close the reactors, has prompted PG&E to consider seeking a longer lifespan for the plant. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) - An aggressive push toward renewable energy has run headlong into anxiety over keeping the lights on in California, where the largest utility is considering whether to try to extend the lifespan of the state's last operating nuclear power plant.

California is the birthplace of the modern environmental movement that for decades has had a fraught relationship with nuclear power, which doesn't produce carbon pollution like fossil fuels but leaves behind waste that can remain dangerously radioactive for centuries.

Now environmentalists find themselves at odds with someone they usually see as an ally: Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, a green energy advocate who supported the 2016 agreement calling for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant to close by 2025 but now is a leading voice to consider a longer operating run.

Newsom