Churches on either side of Methodist schism share much in common — but geographical and racial divides are stark

Staff Photo by Robin Rudd / Chattanooga's historic St. Elmo United Methodist Church is seen Oct. 21. While some United Methodist churches are leaving the denomination, the St. Elmo congregation is planning to stay.
Staff Photo by Robin Rudd / Chattanooga's historic St. Elmo United Methodist Church is seen Oct. 21. While some United Methodist churches are leaving the denomination, the St. Elmo congregation is planning to stay.

The 6,000-plus U.S. churches that split from the United Methodists as of June were disproportionately white and Southern but also had more in common — from median attendance size to growth rate — with churches that opted to remain in the denomination, a study published this month found.

The

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