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Staff photo by Doug Strickland / Newly elected Hamilton County Commissioner David Sharpe, right, talks with his wife Rebekah and daughter Dani Elkins during Sharpe's elections party at Big River Grill on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

some text Staff photo by Doug Strickland / Newly elected Hamilton County Commissioner for District 5 Katherlyn Geter talks during David Sharpe's elections party at Big River Grill on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, in Chattanooga, Tenn.

 

In Hamilton County Commission races, a former school board member claimed a spot on the commission in the same district and only one challenger beat out an incumbent in the contested races.

Republican Chip Baker beat Democratic challenger Elizabeth Baker in District 2, with 4,355 votes compared to her 3,294 votes. The two are not related.

Incumbent Jim Fields didn't seek re-election.

some text Staff photo by Doug Strickland / Newly elected Hamilton County Commissioner for District 8 David Sharpe, center, greets new Commissioner for District 5 Katherlyn Geter during Sharpe's elections party at Big River Grill on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Chip Baker, 60, is the executive director of local event management company Friends of the Festival, the group that puts on Riverbend each year. He served for 12 years on the Hamilton County school board representing District 2.

"I appreciate the opportunity to make our community better, and it's an honor to continue to serve Hamilton County and continue growing our economy," Chip Baker said Thursday night.

District 2 covers Fairmount, Lupton City, Mountain Creek 1, Red Bank 3, Signal Mountain 1 and 2, Stuart Heights, Valdeau and Walden.

In District 6, Democratic challenger David Sharpe defeated Republican incumbent Joe Graham in District 6.

After the lead initially teetered back and forth, Sharpe jumped ahead of Graham with 3,439 versus 2,710.

Sharpe, 41, is a local businessman.

"I am humbled by the support we received from friends and neighbors all across District 6," Sharpe said in a statement Thursday night. "I am proud of the campaign we ran and I want to thank each and every person who supported our effort. During this campaign I engaged with Democrats, Republicans and independents and they all agreed that we must make public education a true priority in Hamilton County."

The district includes Bonny Oaks, parts of East Chattanooga and Eastgate, parts of Kings Point and Summit, and Woodmore.

District 3 Republican incumbent Greg Martin successfully fended off Democratic challenger Rosabelle Gorman.

Martin brought in 5,156 votes, while Gorman only gathered 2,059.

"I'm thankful to the citizens that got out in this monsoon storm this morning to cast their vote for the candidates that they trust and want to serve them," Martin said Thursday night. "I'm just appreciative that the vast majority of people chose me to continue serving. I'm humbled and thankful."

The district covers Hixson, Lakesite and Middle Valley.

In the District 4 race, incumbent Democrat Warren Mackey easily kept his seat. This will be Mackey's fourth term.

Mackey received 2,535 votes to independent challenger Chris Dahl's 565 in unofficial results.

Mackey, 68, is a former history professor and local business owner.

"It feels like a vote of confidence," Mackey said of Thursday night's results. "I want to thank all of the voters and supporters of the fourth district who have entrusted their vote with me, and I want to say right now that I will not let them down. I will continue to be present and to listen to my constituents."

District 4 includes Alton Park, East Chattanooga, Kingspoint 1, Murray Hills 1 and Ridgedale 1 and 2.

The remaining races — Districts 1, 5, 7, 8 and 9 — were unopposed in Thursday's election.

Commissioners Sabrena Smedley in District 7 (Apison, parts of Collegedale, Ooltewah and East Brainerd) and Chester Bankston in District 9 (parts of Collegedale, Harrison, Murray Hills, Ooltewah, Snow Hill and Summit) had no opposition in Thursday's election or in the May primaries.

County commissioners are paid $23,128 a year, with an additional $2,500 for the vice chairman and $5,000 for the chairman. Commissioners have four-year terms.

Contact staff writer Rosana Hughes at rhughes@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6327 with tips or story ideas. Follow her on Twitter @HughesRosana.

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