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Sen. Bob Corker speaks after receiving the Heart of Haiti Award during Children's Nutrition Program of Haiti's Celebrating 20 Years of Success celebration at Stratton Hall on Friday, May 18, 2018, in Chattanooga, Tenn.

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who is pushing the Senate to vote to override some of the proposed import tariffs proposed by the president, said today that the White House plan to aid farmers hurt by tariffs is the wrong approach to the problem.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture today said it will provide a $12 billion "short-term" plan to help U.S. farmers hurt by retaliatory tariffs. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue says the plan will help a broad number of farmers deal with the cost of "disruptive markets" as U.S. trading partners have retaliated for President Donald Trump's tariffs on imported goods.

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"I am glad that the administration finally seems to understand that the Trump-Pence tariffs are hurting the American people," Corker said. "These tariffs are a massive tax increase on American consumers and businesses, and instead of offering welfare to farmers to solve a problem they themselves created, the administration should reverse course and end this incoherent policy. We will continue to push for a binding vote here in Congress to reassert our constitutional role on national security-designated tariffs."

Before departing for Kansas City today, Trump tweeted that U.S. trade partners need to either negotiate a "fair deal, or it gets hit with Tariffs. It's as simple as that."

The president has engaged in hard-line trading negotiations with China, Canada and European nations, seeking to renegotiate agreements he says have undermined the nation's manufacturing base and led to a wave of job losses in recent decades.

The imposition of punishing tariffs on imported goods has been a favored tactic by Trump, but it has prompted U.S. partners to retaliate, creating risks for the economy.

Trump has placed tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, saying they pose a threat to U.S. national security, an argument that allies such as the European Union and Canada reject. He has also threatened to slap tariffs on imported cars, trucks and auto parts, potentially targeting imports that last year totaled $335 billion.

During a Monday event at the White House featuring American-made goods, Trump displayed a green hat that read, "Make Our Farmers Great Again."

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