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Trump visits Chattanooga

Sunday's White House visit was a chance to rejoice for self-described moderates, independents and conservatives who believe President Trump is fulfilling campaign promises and want to support more candidates interested in his administration's vision. 

Chants of "USA, USA" and "Lock her Up" briefly wafted across the waiting gates outside McKenzie Arena around 10am. By noon, lines had amassed on every surrounding block and people wearing "Make America Great Again" apparel and pins of President Trump urinating on CNN cheered for their candidate as a speaker played sound bites from past speeches and advised attendees not to "punch protestors." 

Supporters had a similar complaint: They wished Trump would reduce his divisive and nasty rhetoric on Twitter. But overall, they see a leader who's standing up to an establishment that's disappointed them for years and fulfilling campaign promises. 

Most did not view all media as the enemy of the people but instead think a clear bias exists that clouds the president's achievements. 

Many also praised the president's desire to build a wall and vet more people hoping to immigrate to the United States. They mentioned the so-called caravan moving toward the U.S. Mexico border and view Trump's measures, including sending 5,000 troops to the border, as a sensible measure that would allow America to focus on its issues with education and veteran care. 

Dean Robinson, 72, said he supports a faster path to citizenship because there's good people who want to be here. But in the meantime, he said, he's paying taxes for undocumented families who use services or attend universities. 

Others, like Stephen Spurgeon, who's been traveling to rallies across the country and playing original acoustic hits like "Wake Up in America," said unity among the electorate is more important than candidates. 

Even if you don't like Trump, Spurgeon said, "he may be gone in eight years, whereas our country will still be here. We can find a common ground." 

Brian and Gayle Clark, a married couple from Cleveland, Tenn., believe the rhetoric on both sides, particularly the left, has blinded people from focusing on improving  parts of the education system and being kind to one another. 

They praised Trump's tax cut, said the economy is better than ever and believe government healthcare doesn't always help people but instead creates a mandated set of potentially expensive treatments. 

"We need fresh blood in Washington," Gayle Clark said, adding that establishing tighter term limits for elected officials and doing away with lifetime benefits for outgoing politicians would help them see the reality for most Americans. 

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