Tax reform boosts stock values

Tax reform boosts stock values

Wall Street likes tax reform, but public remains skeptical

January 28th, 2018 by Christopher Rugaber in Business Around the Region
For more articles about personal finance see the 2018 Your Money Guide page

It's easy to see why investors like the tax overhaul: Businesses will benefit from a steep cut in the corporate tax rate. They'll also be able to fully deduct the cost of major purchases from their taxable income, reducing the amount they owe. And companies with large stockpiles of cash overseas can bring the money back to the United States at new, lower rates.

All told, Wall Street analysts estimate the tax package should boost earnings for companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index by roughly 8 percent this year. That's much more generous than the average tax cut of 1.6 percent that middle-class families will receive, according to the Tax Policy Center.

"All else being equal, this should go straight to the bottom line," said David Joy, chief market strategist for Ameriprise Financial, a financial services company based in Minneapolis. Improved corporate profits contributed to the market's gains last year.

The public has been less enthusiastic about the tax law. A Monmouth University poll in December when Congress approved the tax overhaul package found that nearly half of Americans disapproved of it, with only 26 percent in support.

Still, some workers have seen a benefit: So far, dozens of companies have announced bonuses and higher minimum wages as a result of the tax cut. AT&T, Comcast, Bank of America, and American Airlines have all pledged to pay $1,000 bonuses to their employees.

Investors also appear less concerned than many politicians about how the additional profits will be used. The Trump administration says it expects companies will plow much of the extra profit back into their businesses, purchasing more software, machinery, and other equipment. Those investments will make workers more productive and provide a key boost to the economy's long-run growth. They should also boost wages and salaries for employees.

Opponents of the tax law respond that companies are more likely to pass the windfall on to shareholders in the form of higher dividend payments and share buybacks, which raise the price of those shares still in investors' hands. Previous cuts in corporate tax rates, in the U.S. and overseas, haven't always led to higher wages.


Loading...