61 single-family homes OKed near downtown Chattanooga

61 single-family homes OKed near downtown Chattanooga

City Council will have final say next month

September 18th, 2018 by Mike Pare in Business Around the Region

A new 61-unit, single-family residential development is planned just outside of downtown Chattanooga in the Stringer's Ridge area.

Plans are for the homes to go on 11.8 acres on the 1000 block of Beason Drive between Pineville Road and West Elmwood Drive, just across the Tennessee River north of downtown.

William Wilson of property owner Beason View Land Co. said the project is for a neighborhood of single-family homes and there will be no rental units.

He said the sale price of the homes and the overall project cost will be determined by "market conditions."

Donna Shepherd of A.D. Engineering Services Inc. told the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Regional Planning Commission, where the project recently won approval, that the new homes are to be kept on the ridge line.

"This will be an improvement to the area for residents as well," Shepherd said about the project, which is expected to go before the city council for final approval on Oct. 9. She said plans are to improve Beason Drive to city standards.

However, some residents in the Pineville Road area raised questions about drainage.

John Mosier said more residential units on the ridge will create flooding problems below.

"If you put another [development] on the ridge, we might as well get boats to stay afloat," he told the planning panel.

Tina Jones of 963 Henderson Ave. worried about a decrease in home values created by the new housing.

Another Pinewood Road resident was concerned about drainage along with noise. She termed the area "the last bastion of the scenic part of the Scenic City. It's out of the way."

The planning panel last week approved the project over the recommendation of the staff, which had called for denying the action. The staff said the proposed development followed a style that is consistent with what's commonly seen in the suburbs.

The staff report said that while open space was dedicated on the site plan supplied with the project's application, it was not clearly separated from stormwater detention and one of the three open-space lots is not accessible from any public right of way.

"The proposal does not encourage new techniques and technology, such as cluster or conservation development, for community development," the staff said.

If approved by the Chattanooga City Council, it's not known when work may start on the project.

Contact Mike Pare at mpare@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6318. Follow him on Twitter @MikePareTFP.