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Tiffany Bryant named Junk King managing member in Chattanooga

Junk King, a national junk removal company, announced that the Chattanooga location has new ownership with local resident Tiffany Bryant.

She joins Junk King as the managing member of the Chattanooga location. Close at hand is her husband, Aaron, who has an extensive background in accounting.

Junk King Chattanooga was started in 2011 by Fred Friday. Selling Junk King Chattanooga will allow him to focus on retirement.

"Junk King's business has been growing rapidly, and there's no better time for us to join their movement," said Tiffany Bryant. "With the number of people and businesses in need of junk removal services continuing to increase, we're ready to answer their calling and provide them with the best client service possible."

 

CEOs expect growth to slow in 2019

Top U.S. CEOs reported Wednesday that their economic outlook weakened in the first three months of the year although it remains above its historical average.

The Business Roundtable, a lobbying organization of major companies' chief executives, said its economic outlook index for the January-March quarter fell to 95.2, down from 104.4 in the fourth quarter of 2018. The lower reading, however, far exceeded the index's historical average of 82.4 for the ninth straight quarter.

The new survey showed that companies' plans for capital investment in the next six months fell 6.9 percentage points since the 2018 fourth quarter, while sales expectations dropped 9.6 percentage points. The executives' hiring plans for the next six months showed an even more dramatic decrease of 11.3 percentage points.

A slowdown in manufacturing and retail, sluggish housing and construction activity and global pressures, including an ongoing trade war with China, have dampened expectations for economic growth.

 

EU claims Google violates anti-trust

European authorities on Wednesday fined Google $1.7 billion for antitrust violations in the online advertising market, continuing its efforts to rein in the world's biggest technology companies.

The fine is the third against Google by the European Union since 2017, reinforcing the region's position as the world's most aggressive watchdog of an industry with an increasingly powerful role in society and the global economy. The regulators said Google had violated antitrust rules by imposing unfair terms on companies that used its search bar on their websites in Europe.

"Google has cemented its dominance in online search adverts and shielded itself from competitive pressure by imposing anti-competitive contractual restrictions on third-party websites. This is illegal under EU antitrust rules," Margrethe Vestager, Europe's top antitrust watchdog, said in a statement.

 

Judge blocks drilling plans

A judge blocked oil and gas drilling on almost 500 square miles (1,295 sq. kilometers) in Wyoming and said the federal government must consider the cumulative climate change impact of leasing broad swaths of U.S. public land for oil and gas exploration.

The order marks the latest in a string of court rulings over the past decade — including one last month in Montana — that have faulted the U.S. for inadequate consideration of greenhouse gas emissions when approving oil, gas and coal projects on federal land.

U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras in Washington, appeared to go a step further than other judges in his order issued late Tuesday.

Previous rulings focused on individual lease sales or permits. But Contreras said that when the U.S. Bureau of Land Management auctions public lands for oil and gas leasing, officials must consider emissions from past, present and foreseeable future oil and gas leases nationwide.

"Given the national, cumulative nature of climate change, considering each individual drilling project in a vacuum deprives the agency and the public of the context necessary to evaluate oil and gas drilling on federal land," Contreras wrote.

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