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This Sept. 30, 2019, file photo shows a box of Maximum Strength Zantac tablets at a pharmacy in Miami Beach, Fla. Drugmaker Sanofi is recalling its over-the-counter heartburn drug Zantac in the U.S. and Canada because of possible contamination. The French company Friday, Oct. 18, 2019 joined other drugmakers that have recently recalled their versions of the popular heartburn and ulcer drug. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

Drugmaker Sanofi is recalling its over-the-counter heartburn drug Zantac in the U.S. and Canada because of possible contamination.

The French company Friday joined other drugmakers that have recently recalled their versions of the popular heartburn and ulcer drug.

In September, the Food and Drug Administration said a potentially cancer-causing chemical had been detected at low levels in prescription and over-the-counter versions of Zantac. The federal agency said consumers could consider taking another heartburn medicine or contact their doctor.

Several drugstore chains have already removed Zantac and generic versions from store shelves.

 

Google uses drones for Virginia deliveries

A Google affiliate is using drones to deliver customers' Walgreens purchases in a test being run in a Virginia town.

Wing, which is owned by Google parent Alphabet, received federal approval earlier this year to make commercial deliveries by drone. It was the first drone company to receive the approval in the U.S., beating out Amazon's Prime Air.

Wing partnered with Walgreens to perform the tests that began Friday in Christiansburg, Virginia. Walgreens customers in the town will be able to order from a list of more than 100 items and get them delivered to their doors by drones.

The drones will start with a flying radius of about 4 miles (6.5 kilometers) from Wing's distribution facility in Christiansburg.

Wing has also launched tests in Australia and Helsinki, Finland.

 

some text Mike Sarvis / Staff file photo

Synovus Bank head to leave Chattanooga

Mike Sarvis, the market president of Synovus Bank in Chattanooga and a former chairman of the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce, is leaving Chattanooga at the end of the month to return to Greenville, South Carolina where he previously worked and where his wife is from.

Sarvis, the 52-year-old banker who has worked at Synovus for nearly 19 years, said Friday he is taking on a new job he will announce later in Greenville.

"It's a 'homecoming' of sorts for our family as I started my banking career there 30 years ago, Andrea was raised there and our first two children were born there," Sarvis said.

Sarvis came to the former Cohutta Banking Co. in Dalton, Georgia after working with First Citizens Bank in Greenville, South Carolina. In Chattanooga, he helped grow Synovus' local deposits to $156.6 million as of June 30, making Synovus the 13th biggest of the 28 banks operating in metro Chattanooga. Synovus has not yet announced a successor for Sarvis to head its Chattanooga operations.

Sarvis served as Chattanooga Chamber chairman in 2017 and also previously served as chairman of the Boys & Girls Club of Chattanooga and the Chattanooga Heart Walk. A father of three children, he was also formerly president of the Leadership Chattanooga Alumni Association.

 

China economy slowdown deepens

China's economic growth sank to a new multi-decade low in the latest quarter as a trade war with the U.S. deepened a slump that is weighing on the global economy.

Growth in the world's second-largest economy slipped to 6% in the three months ending in September, down from the previous quarter's 6.2%, data showed Friday. It was the weakest level since China started reporting data by quarters in 1993.

The slowdown and weakening consumer demand add to headaches for Chinese leaders as they fight a 15-month-old tariff war that has sapped China's exports.

Still, the slowdown will not necessarily compel decision makers in Beijing to reach an agreement with President Donald Trump since domestic factors, rather than trade, are having a bigger impact on the economy, said Julian Evans-Pritchard of Capital Economics.

"I don't think striking a deal with the U.S. and lifting those tariffs would resolve the issues the Chinese economy is facing," said Evans-Pritchard. "It would be only a modest boost."

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