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Prosecutors in Germany have filed charges against six more individuals in connection with Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal, bringing the total to 11.

Prosecutors in the town of Braunschweig said Tuesday that the suspects - all Volkswagen executives at the time - were responsible for cars that had software that let them pass emissions tests in labs but then turned off pollution controls. It said the illegal actions involved took place at different times between 2006 and 2015.

The prosecutors' statement did not name the individuals charged.

Three of the accused were charged with direct offenses and the other three as accessories to the offenses, meaning they assisted or facilitated them. The prosecutors said 32 more individuals were under investigation.

Those charged earlier include former CEO Martin Winterkorn. He resigned after the scandal erupted in 2015. Winterkorn also faces charges in the U.S. but cannot be extradited.

The company has paid more than 30 billion euros ($33 billion) in fines, settlements and recall costs.

 

Russell Stover cuts jobs in Cookeville, Tennessee

Russell Stover Chocolates plans to close some facilities and stores nationwide, but the expected loss of about 400 jobs will be offset by new jobs resulting from expansion in other areas, the company announced Tuesday.

The company will close distribution and fulfillment centers in Butler, Missouri, and Cookeville, Tennessee, with work from the Tennessee plant moving to a plant in Corsicana, Texas.

The candy maker plans to add a total of 300 jobs at plants in Corsicana, as well as in Iola and Abilene, Kansas.

A plant in Montrose, Colorado, will be closed in 2021, which will increase the workload at the two Kansas plants, according to a company statement. Russell Stover also plans to close some low-traffic stores during the next year but it did not specify where those stores were located.

The changes are part of a consolidation effort begun in 2018, four years after the Kansas City-based company was purchased by Lindt & Sprungli of Switzerland.

 

States oppose liquefied natural gas shipments by rail

The attorneys general of 15 states said this week that they oppose a Trump administration proposal to allow rail shipments of liquefied natural gas, arguing the trains will share tracks with passenger trains and travel through congested areas.

The rulemaking by the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration stems from Trump signing an executive order in April that, in addition to seeking to speed up oil and gas pipeline projects, directed the transportation secretary to propose a rule allowing liquefied natural gas to be shipped in approved rail tank cars.

The flammable and odorless liquid would be transported "through densely populated areas, potentially in unit trains of up to 100 tank cars operated by just one person, on the same rail lines used by high speed passenger trains, with inadequate safety precautions," the states said.

They asked the pipeline administration to withdraw the proposed rule pending the completion of more safety studies and the development of an environmental impact statement.

Federal hazardous materials regulations allow LNG shipments by truck, but not by rail, except for with a special permit.

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