ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Stormwater that runs into waterways can bring with it trash, oil and other pollutants downstream. Heavy bouts of rain, like those experienced in the last year, will both pollute area water and cause flooding, furthering the damage.

A new project in Ringgold is set to fix that.

An infiltration garden now sits at the Depot Street Nature Trailhead near South Chickamauga Creek. The garden catches stormwater runoff from impermeable surfaces like the street and trailhead driveway, giving the water a place to slowly trickle into the ground versus the creek. The natural landscape acts like a sponge, absorbing the water, a press release explains.

The system is also equipped with hidden trench boxes capable of capturing large quantities of water to alleviate flooding in hard rains, which can cause bank erosion over time. The underground boxes are hidden beneath the trail, catching water before it can get to the creek.

Additionally, the project added coconut-filled burlap sacks along the trail to filter the water along the creek.

some text
Nick Millwood / Contributed file photo

The garden was designed by Canton-based Stormwater Landscapes through funding from the Limestone Valley Regional Commission.

Students from Heritage High School's agriculture classes assisted with the planting of native plants and bushes throughout the site.

"This is going to make our creek cleaner," Mayor Nick Millwood said at an Oct. 14 meeting when the project's site was approved unanimously by the City Council.

Email Sabrina Bodon at sbodon@timesfreepress.com.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT