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Staff file photo / FreightWaves CEO Craig Fuller talks about the freight data and analystics company based in Chattanooga.

Craig Fuller is the founder and CEO of FreightWaves, a provider of supply chain and logistics data, news and information, which recently debuted at No. 85 on the Inc. 5000 list of the country's fastest growing companies. Fuller, who launched FreightWaves in 2016, grew up in the logistics business, and worked in multiple roles at U.S. Xpress, the company founded by his father, Max, as well as serving as CEO of TransCard. In July, Fuller acquired Flying Magazine, the most widely read publication in the sector, with plans for it to serve as the base of a broader aviation concept. Fuller, a longtime pilot, said he'll invest in online and mobile platforms, with a bigger focus on aviation photography, podcasts and streaming video.

What books have you read and recommended to others that influence how you've developed your career?

I love reading books about entrepreneurs and the companies they founded. I love when there is some drama to the story, requiring the founder to adapt or die. "Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America's Eyeballs," by Gina Keating, is about the story of Netflix vs. Blockbuster, and how a company with the advantages — brand, scale, knowledge, distribution and money — was outgunned by a scrappy startup. "Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike," by Phil Knight, also fits this mold. I loved reading about the early struggles of a young Knight in building Nike.

As a media entrepreneur, I also love books about the mavericks of media. A few favorites: "Bloomberg by Bloomberg," by Michael Bloomberg; "Up all Night: Ted Turner, CNN, and the Birth of 24-hour News," by Lisa Napoli; and "Cable Cowboy: John Malone and the Rise of the Modern Cable Business," by Mark Robichaux.

What books have you recently read for pleasure that you're telling others about?

The most influential book I've read is "Triumphs of Experience," by George E. Vaillant, about the Harvard Grant Study. It is based on the largest longitudinal study in history, following 238 men from the time they were in college until death. The book highlighted the circumstances and the choices these participants made and how they impacted everything: health, longevity, wealth, happiness, marriage, children and death. I've reached a point in my life where it is less about "making it" and more about trying to shape the type of life I want for me and my family.

What is next on your to-read list?

"The Art of Business Wars," by David Brown is next up. I am a huge fan of the Business Wars podcast, and can't wait to read about the tactics and antics of the incumbent trying to fend off the disrupter.

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