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Tennessee PBS stations to continue to offer educational programs in response to COVID-19

The Tennessee Department of Education announced Monday a second phase of its partnership with statewide PBS stations to help ensure children continue to have access to educational content during the summer, according to a news release.

Starting June 1, all six Tennessee PBS stations — WNPT Nashville, East Tennessee PBS, WCTE Upper Cumberland, WKNO Memphis, West TN PBS and Chattanooga WTCI — will offer educational programming for grades K-3, weekdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST through June and July.

"We are incredibly grateful for this PBS partnership, which has made it possible to provide more students with access to educational content," Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn said in a statement. "We have seen an overwhelming response to the Teaching Tennessee Learning Series, created by Tennessee teachers in Tennessee classrooms, so we are excited about the opportunity to continue the partnership and keep students engaged, learning and growing all summer long."

The PBS effort began in April, in response to statewide school closures due to COVID-19, and Tennessee teachers and districts created "Tennessee Teaching," an at-home learning series consisting of more than 300 virtual classroom lessons.

The lessons will also be posted on the Tennessee Department of Education's YouTube page. For more information, visit: www.tn.pbslearningmedia.org.

 

Chattanooga State librarian recognized for 'Making a Difference'

Dwight Hunter, an assistant librarian in the Kolwyck Library and Information Commons at Chattanooga State Community College, was awarded the 2019-2020 "Making a Difference" award by the Tennessee Library Association.

Hunter was recognized for his commitment to volunteering and serving the community, including the creation of the "300 Hours of Literacy Program" through the Tennessee Parent Teacher Association. Hunter is also president-elect of the organization.

"He created a 300 Hours of Literacy program for more than 35,000 members in PTA units across Tennessee. The program encouraged members to hold meetings about the importance of reading and information literacy, hold family reading nights, and to have book clubs," Lori Warren, the fellow librarian who nominated Hunter, said in a statement.

Hunter — who is the the Kolwyck Library's policy writer, heads the library's social media team and sits on the Tennessee Board of Regents Library Accessibility Task Force — has previously been recognized for his service. In 2006, he was awarded the Corporation for National and Community Service President's Volunteer Service Award — an award that honors individuals whose service positively affects communities and inspires those around them to take action too.

"I did not think about volunteering as a passion until my children were in school, but when volunteering took off as a passion, I've been involved in decision-making, learning information, and most of all, helping make a difference," reads a statement by Hunter. "What I like most about volunteering – it's not for the glory nor the pat on the back – it's about serving others, helping others."

If you have news about local schools you'd like included in Class Notes, email Meghan Mangrum at mmangrum@timesfreepress.com.

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