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FILE - This March 22, 2013, file photo, shows exterior of the Internal Revenue Service building in Washington. It’s the top complaint to a U.S. Senate hotline for seniors: fraudsters posing as IRS agents, threatening arrests and demanding money. A Treasury Department official told lawmakers Feb. 15, 2017, that more than 10,000 people have reported falling prey to the so-called “IRS impersonation scam,” many of them elderly Americans. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) - It's the top complaint to a U.S. Senate hotline for seniors: fraudsters posing as IRS agents, threatening arrests and demanding money.

A Treasury Department official told lawmakers Wednesday that more than 10,000 people have reported falling prey to the so-called "IRS impersonation scam," many of them elderly Americans.

Phillip Hatch, who is 81, told a Senate panel via video that he received one of those calls at home in Portland, Maine. The caller told him there was a mistake on his tax returns and federal marshals were coming to arrest him unless he paid the money. Hatch lost $8,000. He says he wishes he hasn't been "so cooperative."

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, chair of the committee, says the criminals target older people, who may be isolated and lonely.

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