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AP photo by Mark Humphrey / Fans watch the Tennessee Titans and the Indianapolis Colts play in an AFC South rivalry matchup at Nissan Stadium last September in Nashville. The Titans hope to open an enclosed stadium by the start of the 2026 season.

It may be elementary, but state Sen. Bo Watson, R-Hixson, apparently fully embraces the "Happy wife, happy life" mantra.

Watson came under some heat earlier this week after the state's $52-plus-billion budget was passed. Watson, who is the Senate Finance Committee chairman, voted yes on the budget, which included half-a-billion bucks for a new domed stadium in Nashville for the Tennessee Titans.

Nashville law firm Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis — folks retained to help lobby the state on behalf of the Titans' new stadium — employs Nicole Osborne Watson, Bo's better half.

To be clear, Watson denied any wrongdoing, noting that his relationship with his wife was disclosed years ago.

Still, you can't help but wonder if Jason Freier and the folks who own the Chattanooga Lookouts — our local Double-AA affiliate that sought state funds for a new stadium — aren't thinking, "Dang, maybe we should have called Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis."

 

Speaking of football

So Tom Brady has been pretty good at football — like, all-time good, with seven Super Bowl championships, the most by any player.

Well, we may have finally found what will lure the ageless Brady — he will turn 45 before the start of this season, his 23rd in the league — from the field to his next endeavor.

Cash. And lots of it.

Fox has agreed to a deal for Brady to become their lead NFL analyst whenever he decides to trade his helmet for a headset.

And the numbers are staggering — a 10-year deal at $37.5 million per year. To talk about a football rather than throw it. Who knew?

Here's how much money that is by comparison. Brady has made more in salary playing football than any other player in NFL history, and he will make about $35 million more talking football in that Fox contract than he has playing it.

His $37.5 million per year deal is more than ESPN paid to lure Joe Buck and Troy Aikman away from Fox to call NFL games.

 

Say what?

With all the craziness around — local elections, school ending, enough pollen to keep a billion bees busy, inflation emptying our wallets, the economics of filling your tank, Ukraine, well you get it — I missed this. But our president has added a Disinformation Governance Board to the Department of Homeland Security.

Yes, I needed to read those words again too. This board is led by someone named Nina Jankowicz, which makes her the official queen of disinformation.

In addition to the mind-scrambling premise of using our tax dollars for a disinformation service — other than the CIA of course — we now hear that one of their main targets is Twitter. And that Jankowicz wants to turn the wild world of social media into a free-for-all with verified blue-check-mark members having the power to edit others.

"There are a lot of people who shouldn't be verified, who aren't legit, in my opinion. I mean, they're real people but they aren't trustworthy," she said in a video released online earlier this week, "essentially edit Twitter by add[ing] context to certain tweets."

Yeah, there's simply no way this will end well.

 

Obit observations

We love to pay tribute to those who have served our country. It feels even more appropriate after our community observed Armed Forces Day this week.

Let's review two notable obits: First, there's retired Col. Jerry William Childers, who spent 30 years in the Army. He served three years in Vietnam flying helicopters. After graduating from college, he also served as the chief of staff at the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell.

And according to his obit, Childers earned more medals than Michael Phelps and Carl Lewis. More than 20 of his medals and honors were listed, including a Purple Heart, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Silver Star and multiple Bronze Service Stars. He was 83.

On the same page Sunday was the grand story of Betty Redfield, who was a true believer in Christ, a three-sport letterman at Hixson High, a willing employee in any endeavor, a Miss America contestant and a devoted military wife.

According to the obit, Redfield, who died at 86 late last month, coordinated the moves of her family — husband William and three kids — to 12 different states during their military journey.

From all of us, thank you both.

Contact Jay Greeson at jgreeson@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6273. Follow him on Twitter @jgreesontfp.

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Jay Greeson
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