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Associated Press File Photo / Microsoft principal founder Bill Gates says the tax plan put forward by 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, is a little too rich for his blood.

* DEMS, DON'T TRUST THE POLLS: Since political polls can be made to say whatever you want them to, we put little stock in them these days. Perhaps Democrats should too. Only three of the last seven Democratic presidential nominees were ahead in national polls in November or December before the primary contests began.

In 1991, for instance, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo led throughout the year but never declared his candidacy. Of those who did, once and future California Gov. Jerry Brown was the leader in the race eventually won by then-Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton.

In 2003, Vermont Gov. Howard Dean led all Democratic candidates for the right to take on President George W. Bush. Eventual candidate, and loser in the general election, Sen. John Kerry, languished in fourth or fifth place.

And, of course, throughout 2007, polls leader Sen. Hillary Clinton was preparing to be president the first time before Illinois Sen. Barack Obama blew past her the following spring.

So, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock and author Marianne Williamson, your time is coming.

* GATES NOT SO HIGH ON WARREN: Speaking of Democratic candidates, contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, and her tax plan got no endorsement from a fellow left-winger, billionaire Bill Gates. The principal Microsoft founder said he'd been doing a little figuring.

"I'm all for super-progressive tax systems," he said. "I've paid over $10 billion in taxes. I've paid more than anyone in taxes. If I had to pay $20 billion, it's fine." But, "when you say I should pay $100 billion [in taxes], then I'm starting to do a little math about what I have left over. You really want the incentive system to be there without threatening that."

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