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The Associated Press / First lady Melania Trump arrives to speak on the second night of the Republican National Convention from the Rose Garden of the White House last week.

Making fun of immigrant's accent

First lady Melania Trump, a native of Slovenia and now an American citizen, was mocked by leftists after her speech from the newly renovated White House Rose Garden last week as part of the virtual Republican National Convention.

Encouraging Americans to "stop the violence" that has been ongoing since May in many large U.S. cities and expressing her "deepest sympathy" for those who have lost loved ones during the coronavirus pandemic, she politely but directly made a case for the re-election of her husband, who "loves this country."

But, leftists couldn't leave well enough alone. And some of those who would open the country's Southern border to any and all comers thought it would be good sport to rip a legal immigrant.

"Oh, God," tweeted singer Bette Midler. "She still can't speak English. ... A UGE bore! ... Get that illegal alien off the stage."

She heard about it, too. Among the critics was this tweet from a Cory Howell: "I'm no supporter of Trump or his family, but to the people making fun of Melania Trump's accent, your xenophobia isn't suddenly cool just because it's directed at a Republican First Lady. Her English is way better than my Slovenian."

A day later, Midler offered a semi-apology, saying she shouldn't have made fun of the accent. But she did not say she was sorry for the immigrant remark.

 

Criticizing a paralyzed candidate

A "PBS Newshour" correspondent criticized a partially paralyzed GOP House candidate in North Carolina last week for getting up from his wheelchair and standing at the end of his virtual Republican National Convention remarks.

Madison Cawthorn, paralyzed in a 2014 car accident, closed his comments by saying Americans should not "cower to a mob" and should "kneel before God but stand for our flag."

"Be a radical for liberty and be a radical for our republic for which I stand," he said, slowly rising to a walker, "one nation under God, with liberty and justice for all."

The correspondent, Yamiche Alcindor, also a contributor to NBC and MSNBC, said Cawthorn's gesture, rather than brave and patriotic, was "a direct rebuke of actions by ppl — including black [sic] athletes who are currently sitting out games — protesting police brutality."

"Madison Cawthorn may be paralyzed," tweeted Sean Davis, co-founder of the Federalist, "but @Yamiche is the one who is a completely broken person. Only a deranged lunatic who worships at the altar of politics could get angry at the sight of a paralyzed person standing up. What a sad, pathetic way to go through life."

 

Biden's newest supporter

The neo-Nazi and white supremacist who organized the riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017 says he'll be voting for the Biden-Harris ticket in November.

Richard Spencer said he believes the Democrats will be tougher on crime and tougher on Black Lives Matter than President Trump.

He also said his vote will be on competence, not ideology. But in 2017 he said abortion advances white nationalist goals — that "the people who are having abortions are generally very often Black or Hispanic or from very poor circumstances." And the Biden-Harris ticket recently was named by the Susan B. Anthony List the "most pro-abortion ticket" in U.S. history.

If nothing else, maybe it will end the lie, told as recently as the Democratic National Convention, that Trump in 2017 praised Spencer and his like during the riots. While Trump said there were "very fine people on both sides" arguing over the presence of a monument to Robert E. Lee, of Spencer's ilk he said, "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides."

 

Against the bill before she was for it

Iowa Democratic Senate candidate Theresa Greenfield, channeling Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry in the 2004 election, said she is for the CARES Act that was passed in March after she was against it.

Kerry, then a Massachusetts senator, infamously said he "actually did vote for the $87 billion [in military appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan] before I voted against it."

In Greenfield's case, she criticized Republican Sen. Joni Ernst in June for supporting the measure, saying it bailed out her "corporate" donors. And as late as earlier this month the Democratic Senate Majority PAC launched an ad against Ernst for her support.

But the challenger now says she would have voted for it.

"You know," Greenfield told Iowa PBS, "I certainly would have supported that CARES Act. Yup. We needed to get critical help to all Americans and to Iowans."

Ernst spokeswoman Melissa Deatsch said the Democrat wanting to have it both ways is typical.

"[Her] hypocrisy ... is the clearest sign yet that Greenfield has already gone Washington," she said in a statement. "From attacking Joni on something she herself supports, to submitting forged signatures to gain ballot access in 2018, to kicking out small business owners for a multinational grocery store, Greenfield will say or do anything to benefit herself over Iowans."

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