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Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks to supporters as he receives the endorsement of Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) in Flint, Mich., on Monday, March 9, 2020. The endorsement adds to what has become a nearly complete consolidation of support from Biden’s former top rivals to push him to the Democratic nomination. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)

Biden off the graph, again

A Michigan autoworker wasn't even sure Joe Biden was planning to take questions at a recent appearance, but when he got the opportunity he asked about a concern he had — his Second Amendment rights.

"I ... asked him how he wanted to get the vote of the working man when a lot of us, we wield arms," Fiat-Chrysler worker Jerry Wayne said. "We bear arms and we like to do that. And if he wants to give us work and take our guns, I don't see how he is going to get the same vote."

Biden, for some reason, couldn't give him a straight answer.

"You're full of s---," the former vice president said. "I support the Second Amendment." He later said, "I'm gonna slap you in the face."

At the same appearance, Biden referred to an AR-15 as an AR-14.

"I thought I was pretty articulate and respectful," Wayne told "Fox & Friends." "I didn't try to raise any feathers, and he kind of just went off the deep end."

 

Pass the Kung-Pao Chicken

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Democratic Party's gift to Republicans, weighed in on the coronavirus last week, saying many restaurants "are feeling the pain of racism" because people are avoiding Chinese restaurants out of fear of contracting the illness.

They're not "patroning" Chinese or Asian restaurants, she said.

If she'd checked, the 30-year-old Ocasio-Cortez might have realized those not "patroning" those restaurants are probably not "patroning" Mexican, French or American restaurants, either.

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee captured the continued wonder of Americans at her comments on Twitter.

"This is like an SNL ("Saturday Night Live") parody," he tweeted. "She is like literally like not aware of like literally much of like anything, like not even the fact there's like literally no word 'patroning' and she like is literally clueless as to what like racism literally means. And she is in Congress. Literally!"

 

A divided household

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey, and his girlfriend, singer-actress Rosario Dawson, are going their separate ways. Politically, that is.

Booker, a presidential candidate until dropping out in January, endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden recently, saying in a tweet he "won't only win, he'll show there is more that unites us than divides us."

Dawson wasn't having any of that, though.

"I got to vote for Bernie again and I did," she said on Facebook. " ... Make this election one for the history books. Turn out needs to be historic to drive home the message that we stand for something bigger and better than we have now. ... So please stay in the game, no matter what, and continue the fight our ancestors fought with fewer means and resources ... and make the path that much better, healthier and clearer for the generations to come."

Dawson did support Booker during his abbreviated run.

 

Couldn't be her math

It's now clear why many people called out New York Times editorial board member Mara Gay after her recent on-air math gaffe with MSNBC "11th Hour" host Brian Williams — racism.

At least, that's her story.

Gay and Williams chuckled on air that with the $500 million failed Democratic candidate Michael Bloomberg spent on his campaign, he could have given every American — all 327 million of them — $1 million. And have some left over.

It was actually more like $1.53, but who's counting?

But Gay said those people who called the pair on the boo-boo, "a trivial math mistake," were a "racist Twitter mob." Her op-ed reply in the New York Times was titled "My People Have Been Through Worse Than a Twitter Mob."

Her people? She is black, and Williams is white. Nevertheless, she persisted.

"When you're a black woman in America with a public voice," she said, "a trivial math error can lead to a deluge of hate."

One Twitter reply to her may have said it best:

"I literally have no recollection of what you look like," it read, "and I would venture to say that if you think that being off by $999,998.48 is a trivial mistake, I can understand why you are a Democrat."

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