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Let's all pitch in for the good of the community, one another

I am tired. Tired physically, temperamentally, intellectually and significantly politically. It has been a season of challenges on many fronts with each aspect of our lives being under stress.

As our holidays approach, I am asking everyone to consider how we can each relate to one another and our communities in a positive way. We are all seeking peace, good health and generally safe welfare.

Let's listen to each other and remember that we are in this thing called life together. If we all pitch in, there is no stopping us. Wishing all happy holidays and a healthy and safe New Year.

Irv Ginsburg

 

If you listen to me, maybe I can save you

I need to warn you. Maybe if you'll listen, I can save you.

I want to tell you that you'll be waiting up in the middle of the night writing down the things you want to say. This will be your only chance. You won't have much time if the nurse can even call at all.

You'll wonder if they heard you. If they know you tried to be there.

You'll close your eyes to go to sleep, but sleep will never come.

I want to tell you that you'll be at work thinking about them being alone. Dying alone. You'll live in this hell for days. You have to live with it.

I think if I can just tell you, you'll wear a mask; you'll postpone the celebration. If I can just warn you, you won't have to say goodbye on the phone.

But the ones who know have been telling you. Telling you since the beginning. Trying to save you from the heartache. Trying to save you from condemning others.

Do you think it can't happen to you? Do you think it won't happen to the person you love the most? Do you think that others don't matter?

I guess I don't understand you. But I want to tell you. I need to warn you. Maybe if you'll listen, I can save you.

Taylor Hixson

 

Will we heed takeaways of Trump?

Well, justice prevails, the center held. Despite the outrageous and underhanded attempts to subvert our election and thwart a peaceful transfer of power, on Jan. 20 we will restore sane and solid leadership to our executive branch of government.

The Trump experience, however, has not been without its instructive takeaways. However painful, it has informed us to three crucial elements: just how much character matters; how dangerous to national and domestic security an uninformed and unscrupulous president can be; and lastly, how fragile our democratic institutions are under the withering assault of a self-serving and conscienceless chief executive. Considerations one can only hope will be processed, assimilated and applied to future elections.

Denny Pistoll

Rising Fawn, Georgia

 

Action of U.S. Reps. will be remembered

Just read that our U.S. representatives who took an oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution decided to subvert that oath by trying to overthrow our voters for a losing president. While grabbing our hard-earned taxpayers' money, they are spending their time worrying about how to take away our democracy. This, of course, is a pathetic way to represent us. Why we choose to keep re-electing these worthless leeches is a mystery to most of us.

I don't care what party you are in, your vote should count and not be taken away by a U.S. representative. Hope we all remember this in the next election.

Jack Pine

Dunlap, Tennessee

 

Worst Generation refuses to mask up

The Greatest Generation. We revere the Americans who with resolve and resiliency rescued a world in turmoil. They rationed, victory gardened, sacrificed, fought and died to save our democracy. More than 16 million served under arms with more than 400,000 deaths. The Greatest Generation saved our nation and its democratic ideals.

As of Dec. 10, the nation has incurred 15.6 million COVID-19 cases with 295,000 deaths. In the face of this, the children of the Greatest Generation are another matter. Sacrifices? Forget it. They are not going to mask, social distance or limit travel. They are going to do what they want to do.

Franklin D. Roosevelt inspired a generation in its darkest hour to greatness. In stark contrast, Donald J. Trump, in corrupt pursuit of personal gain, is indifferent to the tragedy at hand. Even now he threatens the very cornerstone of our democracy, our trust and confidence in the election of our leaders. But for a few brave souls, a once proud Republican Party steadfastly supports him and places our nation in peril. God bless those few.

My parents were the Greatest Generation. I may belong to the Worst Generation. How tragic.

Joseph E. Huber

Soddy-Daisy

 

Blackburn's medical bills solution better

More than half of American adults have received a surprise medical bill for out-of-pocket expenses (on top of expensive insurance premiums, even for high-deductible policies). It's unfair to expect patients to pay even more out of pocket.

Congress is considering several solutions to end surprise bills. But some proposed legislation would give even more power to the insurance industry, at the expense of patients and frontline doctors like emergency physicians. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tennessee, is pushing a so-called compromise solution. Tennesseans shouldn't be fooled. This government rate-setting proposal would give insurance companies the power to arbitrarily slash reimbursements emergency physicians depend on to cover the cost of providing medical care and stay in business. Simply put, rate-setting is a drastic pay cut for doctors risking their lives to treat patients during the pandemic.

Thankfully, Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tennessee, is pushing a solution that would protect patients without giving big health insurance companies more power. She has co-sponsored legislation that would create an independent dispute resolution mechanism, which has worked to protect patients and end surprise bills in both Texas and New York. Thank you, Sen. Blackburn, for standing with doctors and patients.

Andy Walker, M.D.

Signal Mountain

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