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Terrence Oglesby spent two years terrorizing Atlantic Coast Conference competition from the 3-point line, much like he did during a standout career at Bradley Central.

But now, he feels his time is over, as the junior-to-be recently decided to forgo his final two seasons and begin playing professional basketball overseas.

"I have enjoyed my time at Clemson University and want to thank all the fans and friends for being supportive," Oglesby told ClemsonTigers.com. "My decision is based solely on chasing the dream of being a professional basketball player. I would like to thank all my coaches and teammates for a memorable two years, and wish them the best of luck in the future."

"Terrence started talking about this in the spring," Kent Smith, Oglesby's coach at Bradley Central, said. "They're talking like the money is going to be good, but that wasn't big motivation for him. He just wants to be able to work on his game year-round and likes the prospects of this opportunity in the long-term."

Oglesby, Bradley Central's all-time leading scorer with 2,256 points, averaged nearly 12 points per game in two seasons with the Tigers. He scored 13.2 per game this past season as a starter for the Tigers, who were defeated in the first round of the NCAA tournament by Michigan - coincidentally, one of the schools Oglesby considered attending. The sharp-shooter, who trains with former Cleveland Cavalier standout and current Atlanta Hawks shooting coach Mark Price, nailed 177 3-point field goals in his career, good for sixth all-time in Clemson history.

Smith mentioned that Spain and Italy are a couple of the primary locations. Oglesby, whose father played professionally in both Norway and Australia and whose mom is from Norway, has dual citizenship.

Oglesby took his cue from former University of Florida standout Nick Calathes, who withdrew from the NBA Draft to sign a contract in Greece. Calathes also has dual citizenship in Greece.

"They're telling Terrence that he has the opportunity to sign for NBA money," Smith said. "He likes the fact that European-style ball is about a shooting, more wide-open style of play."

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