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A jack-in-the-pulpit spring ephemeral can be seen at some Tennessee State Parks / Getty Images

There is no better time to take a walk in the woods than the spring ephemeral season, according to the Tennessee State Parks website.

Spring ephemerals are known as the "here today, gone tomorrow" plants with many blooming in March and April. These plants have to grow, bloom and store energy to last a year before the trees and shrubs above them fully leaf out and close the canopy, the website states. 

Assistant state naturalist Holly Taylor discusses in the series of videos below some common spring ephemerals to find in Tennessee. 

 

— Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) at Edgar Evins State Park. 

Watch video on Youtube »

 

— Dutchman's breeches and squirrel corn are both members of the genus Dicentra, meaning "two spurs," but how do you tell them apart?

Watch video on Youtube »

 

— Raise your hand if you love shooting stars.

Watch video on Youtube »

 

— Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) is one of the most unique wildflowers in eastern forests. 

Watch video on Youtube »

 

— Dwarf larkspur (Delphinium tricorne) lights up the forest with its indigo blooms.

Watch video on Youtube »

 

For more videos from Tennessee State Parks, visit their YouTube channel here.

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